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Why did the Nazis treatment of the Jews change from 1939 to 1945?

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Introduction

Anthony O'Donoghue 10S Why did the Nazis treatment of the Jews change from 1939 to 1945? Nazis had been discriminating against Jews since Hitler came into power in 1933. Many, many discriminatory acts were carried out against Jews, purely because of their race and religion. Their academic lives, businesses, homes and social lives were all destroyed plus many other of their attachments. However, during the period of 1939 to 1945 treatment towards the Jews was changing. As Nazis were trying to arrive at a 'Final Solution' for the Jews, their conduct transformed due to five main factors. These factors were the Invasion of Poland, the invasion of Russia, World War Two, the failure of earlier methods and the Nazis were facing impending defeat. In this essay I will be explaining why the Nazi policies towards the Jews changed due to these five main occurrences and the Nazis need for a final solution. ...read more.

Middle

So killing squads, known as 'Einsatzgruppen', were designed to slaughter the Jews. They killed 1 million in their first year. Even local residents in Russia carried out massacres of Jews. The executions by mass shooting or one-bullet deaths removed the dignity of the Jews as they were made to undress. Gas vans were also introduced but were a very slow method of execution and were very cumbersome. The failure of earlier methods changed the treatment inflicted on the Jews and directed Nazis more towards a final solution. Exile of Jews was a problem because Jews couldn't afford to go and did no want to, so they just remained and were stamped with a red 'J' on their passports. The significance of the J was that, if the Jews tried to emigrate, other countries would know that they were Jews. The ghettos were not suitable as they were too spread out for Russia and because some rebellious Jews were revolting. ...read more.

Conclusion

A final peak of treatment was suggested, which was to send Jews to the most efficient death and concentration camps. Even though Germany was facing impending defeat in the war, Hitler continued to slaughter the Jews. Hungarian Jews were a large main group left. Eichmann was ordered to transport them to the remaining death camps. Death marches on foot to Germany became a 'last gasp' for Jews to be killed. Some camps were destroyed and death marches from the camps to Germany were carried out, in order to conceal the Jews from the approaching Allies. The treatment towards the Jews changed in many ways from 1939 to 1945, as the Nazis 'need' for a 'final solution' grew stronger. These experiments led the Nazis to come to a final solution of how to ultimately deal with Jews during the Wansee conference of 1942 organised by Heydrich. World War Two, the invasion of Poland, the invasion of Russia, the failure of earlier methods and the fact that Germany was clearly losing the war were all causes of fluctuations in the treatment towards Jews. ...read more.

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