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Why did the Nazis treatmentof the Jew change from 1939-1945?

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Introduction

Dale Lingard Wednesday 28th April 2004 Why did the Nazis treatment of the Jew change from 1939-1945? The Nazis treatment of the Jews changed in 1939 for many reasons. The war started, the development of camps and ghettos, the role of himmler and the SS and the changed in policy made during the Wansee conference. The wouldn't have been able to treat the Jews so badly after 1939 if they hadn't had done all of the things before. ...read more.

Middle

Hitler's style of rule was to use a 'carrot and stick' this means the stick was the control Hitler had over Germany, such as putting those people who spoke out in concentration camps. The carrot being the promises about how Germany would be great and he would end poverty and the depression. This meant it was alot easier to carry out actions against the Jews. ...read more.

Conclusion

So there was no policy of Asylim. Another plan was to place all German and European Jews on Madagascar. However the war made this impossible. The German policy of Lebensraum brings many countries with a Jewish population under the control of the Nazis this made the problem worse. The Nazis have to decide what to do. The German Military sucess in the east through Poland and Russia also becomes a problem because this also brings huge numbers of Jews under Nazi control. This therefore puts the pressure on the Nazis as to what is to be done. ...read more.

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