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Why did the Tsar fall from power?

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Introduction

Why did the Tsar fall from power? Anna Bidmead 10s.3 In 1917, Russia had been under Romanov rule for 304 years and although many people were unhappy about the situation, the prospect of change had seemed remote. However, on March 2, Tsar Nicholas signed an act of abdication, which effectively ended autocratic rule in Russia. There were many long-term and short-term causes which eventually lead to the downfall of the Tsar and put pressure on him to abdicate, including food and fuel shortages, cold weather, strikes, rationing, poor economy and bad working living conditions. The Tsarist system meant that the Tsar had complete autocratic rule. He was the head of the state and had control over the Russian Orthodox Church. All the important decisions were made in St. Petersburg, without the consultation of the people of Russia. Communication in Russia was very poor as it was such a vast country and the Tsar was completely out of touch with his people. Nearly 90% of people were peasants, working with the most basic tools. ...read more.

Middle

In July 1914 Russia entered the First World War on the side of France and Britain, fighting Germany and Austria-Hungary. This outbreak of war at first helped the Tsar. Initially, all the social classes rallied together and wanted to help the Tsar and looked to him for leadership, but then after their first defeat at Tannenburg, everything changed after the Tsar began to make some fatal mistakes. In August 1915, the Tsar left Petrograd to command the Russian army. He therefore received the blame personally for all their defeats and lost control of his troops as he left Russia under the rule of the Tsarina and Rasputin. The Russian army was undersized and poorly equipped as Russia had little finances for a war. Russia was doing badly in the war, and the Tsar was being blamed. Meanwhile, Russia was left under control of the Tsarina and Rasputin, who heavily influenced her. The Russians trusted neither of them, as the Tsarina was German and Rasputin was despised for his rebellious background and the rumours surrounding him. ...read more.

Conclusion

All this was made even worse by the long-term war. From this account on the events of the First World War we can see that strikes and food shortages were brought on by the war. Without it, the opposition parties would have not had such a great impact on Russia. Also, the Tsar would not have made those fatal mistakes he made in commanding the army. War helped all the Russian people realise that a complete reform in the practices and lives of the Russians was needed. Prices of goods were constantly rising but wages were not going up at all. Families were distraught and workers asked for more hours to make end meet. Peasants were constricted into the army, which meant fewer workers that caused food shortages and a drop in the living standards of the peasants. Without the war, these things would have carried on getting more and more out of control. We can see that the main triggers of the Russian 1917 revolution were brought on by the war, or made worse because of it. Nicholas knew there that Russia would do better in the war if he abdicated. ...read more.

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