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Why did war break out in 1914?

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Introduction

´╗┐Why Did War Break out in 1914? Jack Richards This war rooted from the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and (less importantly) his wife. This happened on 28th June 1914, as the Archduke bought his wife on her first official trip from their home country Austria, to Bosnia; which, to Serbia upset- as Austria had just gained Bosnia to its empire. The Black Hand gang of Hungary were responsible for this assassination. There were many problems with the assassination. At first, one of the assassins was too shocked too shoot; another forgets the ten second delay on his bomb; when the person who finally shot the duke jumped into a nearby river- it was far too shallow and the poison he had used had passed its date. Yet there were many reasons that helped this group to follow through with this killing, but in the end- it was down to luck and being in the right place at the right time. ...read more.

Middle

An immediate effect of this shooting is Austria?s declaration of war on Serbia. Yet Serbia have the powerful ally, Russia; who prepare to assist in this war on the 29th July (1914). Yet another powerful country, Germany, prepares on the first day of the following month to back up her ally Austria. But an important factor is when France prepares for war, as the ally of Russia, as this resulted in Germany not only declaring war on France, but attacking through Belgium. France and Belgium were, at third time, allies of Britain who declare war on Germany immediately after. And it was at this point, once all of the allies and empires became tangled, that a world war began. The other main trigger was the Schleiffen Plan as this also made the alliances come together. One of the essential facts is that Germany assumed that France was weak and could therefore be beaten quickly, and that on the other hand; Russia was much stronger, but would take longer to mobilise its army. ...read more.

Conclusion

Countries made new technological advances at this time, especially when it came to militarism. And, with the revolutionary dreadnought in development in Germany and Britain- the arms race was on to see who could build the largest amount of good dreadnoughts. Britain won this ?race?, with 29 in comparison to Germany?s 17. This was mass weapon production at its peak. At this time, the patriotisms and patriotic efforts were very high. In Britain, it is believed that we felt superior to other countries, as did Germany and Italy for example, and it was this mutual feeling that stirred partnerships and enemies. As a nation, feeling superior to the rest, we continued tirelessly to attempt to extend our overseas empire and colonies, which were over ten times the area of Germanys. But the mistake, so to speak, that many countries made is by doing this through military force. There were great amounts of friction between the two alliances. As illustrated by Germanys fear of the countries surrounding it. ...read more.

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