• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why does sectarian conflict like that seen at the Holy Cross Primary School in the Ardoyne, North Belfast in October 2001 still happen, when Northern Ireland is meant to be going through a peace process?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why does sectarian conflict like that seen at the Holy Cross Primary School in the Ardoyne, North Belfast in October 2001 still happen, when Northern Ireland is meant to be going through a peace process? To explain why things like this happen we must analyze what happened at Holy Cross in 2001. In the Ardoyne area there is an interface community which means that Catholics and Protestants live side by side. This in itself is a recipe for disaster. There was always a lot of conflict in the area but the reason for the holy cross conflict was set off by simply Protestants and Catholics annoying each other and provoking fights and conflict. ...read more.

Middle

High levels of unemployment persist and this epicentre of the Troubles remains a fertile recruiting ground for paramilitaries. Along with west Belfast, the north of the city has been the centre of killings in the Troubles. If the peace process must work anywhere in Northern Ireland, it must be seen to work in Ardoyne. The schoolgirls in Ardoyne were only babies when the Good Friday Agreement was concluded in 1998. That Agreement was designed to find a way of moving away from the failures of a sectarian society. Three years on, as we look at the scenes from Ardoyne, where is the ``right to equal opportunity in all social and economic activity, regardless of class, creed, disability, gender or ethnicity'' guaranteed in the Agreement? ...read more.

Conclusion

But this is not to say that the agreement has been a total failure. There have been some features of it that have benefited Ireland in the whole. For one more troops have been pulled out and they no longer carried loaded weapons or helmets. Also Ireland has been given its own decision making government that allows Ireland to have more and more of a say in its future. But in the end it is only until groups like the IRA decide enough is enough, to swallow its pride and go along with what decisions are being made to set an example to other splinter groups so that Ireland can at least begin to heal itself and try to put sectarian conflict behind it and move on. By Thomas Graffin Thomas Graffin J10 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. How successful has the peace process in Northern Ireland been?

    Soon after, the republic also accepted consent. The Irish accepted that parts of their constitution (which included and claimed that the North was part of their territory) might have to be changed or altered. Next the Irish Government set up a forum for peace and reconciliation.

  2. Northern Ireland Conflict-Religion vs. PoliticsThe conflict in Northern Ireland is likely one of the ...

    The discussions between Hume and Adams would be the driving factor to talks between the British and Irish governments. In June 1993 both governments came together to discuss the future of each governments relationship to Northern Ireland.

  1. Causes of conflict in Northern Ireland.

    protestant road is Shankill road and because of this there was a sectarian divide. There were barricades erected and then a large wall built and because of this increased division the hatred amongst people increased. This is an important cause of conflict as it divided society into two parts.

  2. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    movement, as did a few others from that period, and the mainstream Ulster Unionist Party, which was divided as to what was the best way forward. Equally, the Unionist government was being pushed very strongly by a Labor government in London to make concessions and it resented the interference.

  1. Why has it been difficult to obtain peace in Northern Ireland?

    hugely again by the Nationalist in Northern Ireland, people saw them as murders and lyres and with the events of Bloody Sunday still on peoples mind the British and Unionist were hated more then ever by Catholics. This effected peace in the long run as well power sharing was not

  2. Loyalist and Nationalist communities still showopen hostility towards each other, as thedemonstrations at Holy ...

    This would be due to the biased views of both communities and therefore the mistreatment of the other one. For instance, in 1922 when the B-specials were given extra powers. This led to the biased views from Protestants and therefore violence towards innocent Catholics.

  1. The train pulled into the station slowly.

    The need for companionship was clear. Like herself, didn't this woman feel like an outsider craving acceptance in a new world? Wasn't Chioma's smile one of acceptance and recognition? She could feel that hatred, some thing almost as physical as walls.

  2. Explain why the marching season in Northern Ireland still causes tension between the two ...

    Religion again played a part in the 1790's. This was the time of Theobald Wolfe Tone and the United Irishmen. Republicans regard Tone as the first real Irish Republican. They admire the fact that he was wiling to use force to separate England and Ireland.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work