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Why does sectarian conflict like that seen at the Holy Cross Primary School in the Ardoyne, North Belfast in October 2001 still happen, when Northern Ireland is meant to be going through a peace process?

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Introduction

Why does sectarian conflict like that seen at the Holy Cross Primary School in the Ardoyne, North Belfast in October 2001 still happen, when Northern Ireland is meant to be going through a peace process? To explain why things like this happen we must analyze what happened at Holy Cross in 2001. In the Ardoyne area there is an interface community which means that Catholics and Protestants live side by side. This in itself is a recipe for disaster. There was always a lot of conflict in the area but the reason for the holy cross conflict was set off by simply Protestants and Catholics annoying each other and provoking fights and conflict. ...read more.

Middle

High levels of unemployment persist and this epicentre of the Troubles remains a fertile recruiting ground for paramilitaries. Along with west Belfast, the north of the city has been the centre of killings in the Troubles. If the peace process must work anywhere in Northern Ireland, it must be seen to work in Ardoyne. The schoolgirls in Ardoyne were only babies when the Good Friday Agreement was concluded in 1998. That Agreement was designed to find a way of moving away from the failures of a sectarian society. Three years on, as we look at the scenes from Ardoyne, where is the ``right to equal opportunity in all social and economic activity, regardless of class, creed, disability, gender or ethnicity'' guaranteed in the Agreement? ...read more.

Conclusion

But this is not to say that the agreement has been a total failure. There have been some features of it that have benefited Ireland in the whole. For one more troops have been pulled out and they no longer carried loaded weapons or helmets. Also Ireland has been given its own decision making government that allows Ireland to have more and more of a say in its future. But in the end it is only until groups like the IRA decide enough is enough, to swallow its pride and go along with what decisions are being made to set an example to other splinter groups so that Ireland can at least begin to heal itself and try to put sectarian conflict behind it and move on. By Thomas Graffin Thomas Graffin J10 ...read more.

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