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Why was Gallipoli a Failure

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Introduction

Why was Gallipoli a failure? Gallipoli or the Dardanelles Campaign was started originally promoted by Winston Churchill and Lord Kitchener. They started this campaign because Russia, one of our allies was blocked from getting land supplies. These were the works of the German Empire and Austria-Hungary. So, the only place Russia can be given their supplies through was by the Mediterranean Sea. But later on, in October 1914, when the Ottoman Empire joined the central powers, Russia could no longer be supplied through the Mediterranean Sea. This was one of the reasons the Gallipoli plan started; of course there were many more such as to try and knock out one of the Allies of the central powers so the war can be easier. Gallipoli was a complete failure even at the start. They're thoughts were very wrong about Gallipoli. They thought the naval attack was going to go through easily and that there would be no land invasion; but hey! ...read more.

Middle

One source says, "The Turks had deployed six times as many troops as there had ready two months earlier." This means that while the ANZAC forces remained in the same number, the Turks had reinforced 6 times! Another severe mistake was the landscape of the bays of Gallipoli, especially Suvla Bay. The Allied troops had no idea of how difficult it would be to invade the bays. The landscape alone was very difficult to attack. Captain Downay tells us more, "The landing place was a difficult one, a narrow sandy beach backed by a very intricate mass of hills, those behind the beach being exceedingly steep." This means that after the very difficult landing place, where most of the soldiers were shot to pieces was the beach and the hills. The beach was the perfect place to get blown to bits and the hill was a steep climb. Another quote from Captain Downay "How they (the soldiers) ...read more.

Conclusion

Another mistake that is linked to the previous paragraph was that there was a shortage of soldiers. Because there was a trench warfare that means that there should be more fresh soldiers. Major Farmar says, "...attacks were made by men in the trenches and not by fresh troops. The men are kept too long and too thick in the trenches: they become stupefied after five days." After months of fighting, Sir Ian Hamilton who was replaced by Sir Charles Munro. They were then evacuated from the area because they knew that they were going to lose. The ANZAC forces completed their evacuations by December 19, 1915 and the British troops were completely evacuated by January 9, 1916. I think that Gallipoli was a complete failure because of all of the problems stated on the past paragraphs and because of very bad planning. They thought the Gallipoli campaign was going to be easy so they just carried on attacking without thinking of planning so this is why 'I' think that Gallipoli was a failure. And of course, the other problems. ...read more.

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