• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why Were British Troops Sent into Northern Ireland in 1969?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why Were British Troops Sent into Northern Ireland in 1969? To answer the question I am going to look at the short term factors, then the long term factor. Then look at the importance of individuals, and followed by a hierarchy of these factors. Catholics played a large part in sparking off anger which fuelled the events in 1969. It began in October 1968, with the forming of a civil rights movement, trying to follow the success of black people in America. At a march on October 5th 1968, peaceful marchers were met with violence from R.U.C.s; this was broadcast on national television, and gained a lot of support from Catholics. In January 1969, The People's Democracy organised a march from Belfast to Derry. Catholics and Protestants met at Burntollet Bridge. Despite warnings of danger, the marchers walked into an ambush from Protestants, although nobody died, the marchers walked into Derry blooded and bruised, causing Catholics to riot in Derry, this led to the Siege of the Bogside, Catholics built barricades to protect themselves from police and Protestants. The British Troops were sent in to keep the peace, but troops being there protected the Catholics, they were sent in because of the increasing violence directed to the Catholics. Protestants are certainly not blameless in sparking of violence. ...read more.

Middle

On August 12th, Protestants march through Derry, celebrating a victory in 1688, on this day 13 apprentice boys shut the gates of Derry on the disgraced Catholic King of England, James II. Then followed the Siege of Derry, 30,000 protestants were cut off in Derry with no food. Although Catholics attacked the walls, they stuck to their chants of "no surrender." Every year they march through Derry with orange sashes, celebrating their triumph, boosting in the faces of Catholics. The march was a catalyst for the troops being sent in, in 1969, Catholics rioted after the march, and the hostility meant that the next days the troops were sent in. After the Wolfe Tone rebellion in 1798, the British lost trust in the Irish to govern themselves. The Act of Union was passed in 1800, this meant that the Irish parliament no longer resided in Ireland; instead it was moved to Westminster. After this the British government has been directly linked to all Irish affairs. If the Act of Union was never made it would be unlikely that it would be British troops being sent in, as the British would feel no responsibility for Irish Rebellions, it may have been southern Ireland troops as they would've still governed themselves. In 1921, a group of Sinn Fein and I.R.A. ...read more.

Conclusion

This movement showed that Catholics wanted change. It showed other Catholics what they could do to make a difference. Actions like these would've inspired marchers fighting for their cause in 1969. Some of these factors are more important than others, I think that the most important factor to these events which led to troops being sent to Ireland would be Henry VIII, and I think he was the most significant because he created the blank canvas on which the two separate sides were always bound to disagree. The arguments in Ireland can all be traced back to the reason that the two sides have different religions. Had Henry VIII not changed the religion then there would be no problems in Ireland. I think that the Protestant role in the Apprentice boys' march was very important too, this event in 1969 immediately sparked off riots and it only took two days before they were totally out of hand. The R.U.C.s and B Specials also affected the situation greatly, had the police force been working properly and retained the trust of the people then there would have been no reason to send in troops, it should be the police's responsibility to keep everybody under control. Not many individuals imposed an extremely important role in these occurrences, but I think that Bernadette Devlin affected a lot of people, first by gaining support for her caused, but it was her who addressed the situation in this light at parliament. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Why Were The British Troops Sent Into Northern Ireland In 1969?

    3 star(s)

    In Northern Ireland the Protestants discriminated against the Catholic minority. The Protestants did not want to give the Catholics any power as they thought that the Catholics might try to take over and unite the North with the South, possibly with the help of the IRA, this would have led to Rome Rule (being controlled by the Pope).

  2. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    And in that respect, Sinn Fein was very much an auxiliary of the Irish Republican Army. They were there for propaganda purposes, they were there to raise the funds, they were there to speak on behalf of the IRA, but they were very much second-cousins.

  1. Did Partition solve the problems in Ireland

    David Trimble of the Ulster Unionists was elected first minister and Seamus Malon of the Social Democratic Labour Party became his deputy. The problems that have led up to the Good Friday Agreement are embedded deep in Irelands history. It is a long chain of events starting with reformation and plantation as I talked about in the last question.

  2. Why were the British Troops sent to Northern Ireland in August 1969?

    The Burntollet Bridge incident was quite important as this was where violence started to get worse as off duty B-Specials were attacking Catholic marches because they didn't believe what concessions they wanted were fair. The people who went on the march believed that what they were asking for was fair,

  1. Examine Synge's Treatment of the Theme of Escapism in,

    "Lift a lighted sod, will you, and scorch his leg" Synge himself came from a fiercely Protestant family (his family had produced five Church of Ireland bishops since settling in Ireland in the seventeenth century) and so he was not in favour of the Church.

  2. Ireland coursework-Part AIreland has had a lot of trouble over the years for many ...

    They passed laws to weaken the Catholic religion, such as not allowing Protestants to marry Catholics and not allowing priest to enter the country. They were called penal laws, they penalised Catholics. One of them made it impossible for Catholics to work for the government because anyone working for the

  1. "Why were British Troops sent into Northern Ireland in 1969?"

    Also they might have been threatened with violence by the IRA to become part of the Republic of Ireland. The above reasons were some of the motives why the second civil rights movement in October 5th which was banned but went ahead anyway was attacked even by police with batons.

  2. Why were British troops sent into Northern Ireland in 1969?

    To solve the problem, the English monarchs sent over (implanted) Protestant farmers and traders to Ireland. Land was taken away from the Irish Catholics and given to the Protestant settlers in the hopes that if there were enough powerful Protestants in Ireland, there would be less of a chance of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work