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Why were the major cities of Britain bombed by the Germans in 1940-41?

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Introduction

Why were the major cities of Britain bombed by the Germans in 1940-41? By the summer of 1940 the war had taken on a new shape. Britain was in the Germans sight after the fall of France on 22nd June 1940. The German aim was simply to destroy the RAF as a prelude to the invasion of Britain (Known as Operation Sea lion). The Germans bombed ports, airfields and radar stations. This started a prolonged battle of the air known as the Battle of Britain. After several weeks of fighting the RAF seemed to be on their knees after a positive initial start but suddenly Hitler changed his tactics. This new tactic of bombing London, and later on other major cities, became known as "The Blitz." ...read more.

Middle

The Germans started bombing the east end of London. They bombed here for numerous reasons. First of all it was retaliation for British bombing of Germany. Second of all because the east end is the area where the docks are. This was important because it meant it would be hard to get supplies in and out of London. The docks were also mostly made out of wood and would burn easily. This is useful because the fire this would cause would act as a target for other bombers. The east end is also one of the most densely populated areas in London and by bombing that area more casualties and more homes were destroyed. ...read more.

Conclusion

Germanys aim of reducing war production failed in Coventry and Liverpool. By January the bombing attacks still visited London but decided to concentrate on the ports of the coasts. Like in the docks of east London they wanted to destroy the places where supplies arrived. Places like Plymouth were bombed again and again which severely affected the morale of the civilians. Small places such as Orkney, Cornwall and Clydebank were bombed as little of Britain was exempt from the blitz. In conclusion an aim of all three phases of the blitz was to damage civilian morale. Although this wasn't the main target for the latter two phases it was Hitler's original; idea of bombing Britain as heavily as possible that they would lose hope and surrender which started the blitz. By Richard Hackforth-Jones ...read more.

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