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Women's Right to Vote

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Introduction

Eva Fernandes Sr. 5D History Coursework Women's Right to Vote Word Count: 1,700 Sources: http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Wwspu.htm http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/53819.stm http://www.welshcommunists.co.uk/suff.htm http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/section/womansuf_InGreatBritain.asp http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/education/bitesize/higher/history/britsuff/suffrage1_rev.shtml http://www.pbs.org/greatwar/interviews/atkinson1.htm http://landow.stg.brown.edu/victorian/gender/wojtczak/bodichon.html http://www.fwck.com/encyclopedia/low/articles/f/f00800184.html http://www.able2know.com/forums/about13501.html http://www.wowessays.com/dbase/ad1/keb122.shtml www.sussex.ac.uk/Units/HUMCENTR/usjch/jworkman2.html www.student.uib.no/~st03428/skriverier/chapter1.html http://www2.worldbook.com/features/whm/html/whm096.html http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/politics/suffragettes/default.htm Ans.1: Suffrage is the right to vote as a citizen in a national election. No race or sex can have its interests properly safeguarded in the legislature of a country unless its represented by direct suffrage. Woman in the 1800's were convinced that if they were given suffrage, they would be able to improve the low status they held economically, politically, socially and in terms of education. Before 1870, girls were given limited education which included of basic reading and writing and mathematical skills. From 1870 a new state-funded system of education was implemented. As a result of the lack of a further education, feminists worked hard to achieve entry to higher education for women in London and Manchester Universities, who by the end of 19 century accepted women, and women's teacher training colleges established. These achievements in the schools and universities were stepping stones to reform. Women had limited career opportunities as domestic service continued to be the most common occupation for the working class women. ...read more.

Middle

Fawcett argued that women could hold responsible posts in society such as sitting on school boards - but could not be trusted to vote; she argued that if parliament made laws and if women had to obey those laws, then women should be part of the process of making those laws; In 1906 one an envoy of 300 women, representing over 125,000 suffragists, male and female, argued for women's suffrage with the Prime Minister, Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman. The younger suffragettes realized that the polite methods previously used by the older generation were achieving nothing and the only option left was to act up for the press. The suffragists restricted itself to peaceful demonstrations and more petitions but the suffragettes switched to hurling stones through windows and when caught the suffragettes refused to be fined and chose imprisonment instead. Once in prison, they went on hunger strikes. Marion Wallace, in 1909, became the first hunger striker other suffragettes quickly followed her lead; the strikes drew the press, and the public interests. Suffrage had thus become a national issue. In 1910 the Conciliation Bill was drafted in Parliament and like the1913 the Franchise Reform Bill, was tossed out due to a bureaucratic slip-up. ...read more.

Conclusion

More importantly Lloyd George who was sympathetic to women's suffrage replaced Asquith as Prime Minister. The war allowed a number of hostile MPs an excuse to change their strong stance against women's suffrage which now seemed untenable and invalid. These MP's, although were not completely supportive of women's suffrage, realized that reform was inevitable and thus used the war effort as a pretext to recant and to save face The suffragettes' militancy is the one of the main factors women's suffrage was achieved in 1918. Although before the war the suffragettes' militancy angered many and seemed as if it would delay the enfranchisement process, it was necessary to threaten the government out of a stalemate and into a state of action. The women by throwing off Victorian ideals created a new identity and a new place in society for themselves. Parliament realised that women's suffrage was going to be achieved, as it was eventual. They used the war as a excuse to give women the right to vote. However if women had not contributed to the war effort with the fervor that they did, parliament may not have had an excuse. It is for all of the above reasons that I partially agree with the statement. Word Count: 580 ...read more.

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