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WW1 Coursework

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Introduction

Character Profile My character's name is called Albert William Lavender. He was born on 26/January/1894, at Hillingdon Heath, Middlesex. At the start of World War 1 he was at the age of 20. Before the war he was a butcher, he didn't have a very good lifestyle with his family. His dad died before just after he left for war, and because of Hannah (mum) not working they were a very poor family. He had no brothers or sisters, which made him very lonely and jealous of other families. He believed very strongly in God and went to church every Sunday. Joining Up Many people and Albert joined up because of peer pressure from friends. Also to persuade him the propaganda posters around town gave him inspiration to fight and kill for king and country, the Lord Kitchner poster made men feel insecure as he was pointing directly at you, and some people felt like an individual as if he only wants you. [See Appendix 1 Lord Kitchner Poster]. When he decided to not join up with his friends, they all called him a homosexual. So he joined up from threats of girls not going to like him. He saw many people be cheered by women and getting attention from the whole town. As he was jealous of other families he wanted attention. Also because of family encouragement. First of all his mum did not appreciate him joining up, but after seeing his dad's reaction of a very big smile and calling him a brave lad he decided to join up. ...read more.

Middle

As propaganda said to soldiers that war not be all fighting, and they would get to do sport and games. Many people, including Albert, were disappointed with the government. Albert could not believe his eyes when he first saw the trenches. He thought it would not be permanent and that he would be moved to a new camp with better facilities, but after 2 years in the trenches, he decided that he was going to die. He wanted to fight for King and country, but after 2 years, he fought for himself and his family due to the lies from the government. However, during the ending period of the war, his belief in God was regained. He thought to himself that God must have been the only reason he survived. The government played a big part in convincing Albert. With all the pressure from friends and the attention from the ladies, Albert was certain to join but have the fear of fighting. But when he saw the posters of people playing cricket and sport [Appendix 1 For Sport Poster], he thought that war couldn't be all that bad and signed up. This resulted in Albert feeling outraged for signing up because the posters convinced him he was going to do activities and not just go out and fight. Physical Surroundings The trenches where a nightmare to live in, wet and muddy flooring, rats and lice everywhere and human bodies everywhere. ...read more.

Conclusion

The World War had given Albert some really terrible visions. When ever his family would try and comfort him he would just argue and have flash backs of the war. He had nothing to lose, he had no home, no job, no friends, so he rejoined. Conclusion Albert William Lavender was affected by the war due to; He took minor wounds too his arms and legs which decreased his mobility for a few months. His trust for the Government was completely depleted as they promised thing within the propaganda posters, like sport playing. Due to the loss of trust within everyone, Albert had nothing to lose and rejoined the army after the way. During this time he was killed by an explosion from a shell. He had serious flashbacks which meant he had emotional moments through out the rest of his life. These flashbacks included things like the trenches, the death of his best friend Tom and the fear of dying. His beliefs in religion changed. He started the war with high hopes and belief in God. But as The Great War continued he started to lose his beliefs as thousands of people had died, and God had not saved them. The fitness of his body changed greatly, his physical form had became stronger from carry weaponry and tools, and digging trenches. But his mental form decreased tremendously as he lost all trust, beliefs and mortality. He could not trust anyone, including his own family. After battle, Albert had nothing else left. His family, he did not trust. Friends where all dead. His job was unavailable, and he had no trust in the Government. ...read more.

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