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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Law
  • Word count: 2661

In the context of the theoretical proposition on the issue of law and morality, give consideration to euthanasia in the context of discussion in the lectures and readings about law and morality.

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Introduction

In the context of the theoretical proposition introduced in the lecture around the issue of law and morality, give consideration to euthanasia in the context of discussion in the lectures and readings about law and morality. The law is created to reflect the society's norms and mores, thus it is a mistake to see law as a completely separate and self contained system. However there is no single moral view held by the community. Each individual's view varies depending on their social background, gender, race, income social class and education. Additionally not only do people have varies perspectives on the morality of a law but their level of conviction of how morally right or wrong the law maybe. One might say a law is wrong but are able to understand other people's perspective on how it could be right while believe another law is outrageously and scandalously wrong.1 Thus issues such as euthanasia as many cases have shown conflict with what people morally believe the law should be. House of Lords Select Committee on Medical Ethics defines euthanasia as "a deliberate intervention undertaken with the express intention of ending a life to relieve intractable suffering"2, Problems of euthanasia is ancient but has surfaced in recent years with renewed urgency and relevance and has increasingly debated in the era of growing medical sophistication combined with long life expectancies, the dying process has been elongated. 3For those who are suffering it has been harder and harder to die not only because of our technological advances in the medical field but also because of our ...read more.

Middle

created a precedent by allowing Mrs Z to travel to Switzerland to be euthanized different to the Pretty v UK in that the assisted death is within a controlled environment overseas in Switzerland instead of assisted death by her husband . 18After she was psychologically tested and shown to have the mental competence to decide for herself, she was able to travel to Switzerland to die.19 In a Postal survey by Khuse , Singer, Baume , Clark and Rickard of Australian doctors in July 1996 published in the Medical Journal of Australia in 1997. They compared results with the Netherland a country similar to Australia except that euthanasia was legal. The proportion of all Australian deaths that resulted from voluntary euthanasia was about 1.8% , 0.1% were from physician assisted suicide and the proportion of all deaths resulting from non voluntary euthanasia was 3.5%. A recent survey by Douglas et al. revealed even higher levels of voluntary and non voluntary euthanasia. 20While in the Netherlands a survey by the government committee headed by PJ van der Maas reported that in 1990 approximately 1.7% of all deaths were the result of voluntary euthanasia and the 0.2% was the result of physician-assisted suicide. 21Additionally there were 1000 cases (which amounted to 0.8% of all deaths) of non-voluntary euthanasia-death were patients were intentionally killed without the patient's request. 22 Not only does the results show that Euthanasia still exists in Australia where euthanasia is illegal but a small percentage of patients are terminated without consent. ...read more.

Conclusion

12 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 13 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 14 Diane Pretty makes final 'death with dignity' plea. London: The Guardian, c2002. http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2002/mar/20/health.uknews 15 Diane Pretty makes final 'death with dignity' plea. London: The Guardian, c2002. http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2002/mar/20/health.uknews 16 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 17 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 18 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 19 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 20 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 21 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 22 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 23 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 24 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 25 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 26 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 27 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 28 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 29 Otlowski, Margaret. Voluntary Euthanasia and the Common Law. United States: Oxford University Press, 1997. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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