• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Law
  • Word count: 2661

In the context of the theoretical proposition on the issue of law and morality, give consideration to euthanasia in the context of discussion in the lectures and readings about law and morality.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In the context of the theoretical proposition introduced in the lecture around the issue of law and morality, give consideration to euthanasia in the context of discussion in the lectures and readings about law and morality. The law is created to reflect the society's norms and mores, thus it is a mistake to see law as a completely separate and self contained system. However there is no single moral view held by the community. Each individual's view varies depending on their social background, gender, race, income social class and education. Additionally not only do people have varies perspectives on the morality of a law but their level of conviction of how morally right or wrong the law maybe. One might say a law is wrong but are able to understand other people's perspective on how it could be right while believe another law is outrageously and scandalously wrong.1 Thus issues such as euthanasia as many cases have shown conflict with what people morally believe the law should be. House of Lords Select Committee on Medical Ethics defines euthanasia as "a deliberate intervention undertaken with the express intention of ending a life to relieve intractable suffering"2, Problems of euthanasia is ancient but has surfaced in recent years with renewed urgency and relevance and has increasingly debated in the era of growing medical sophistication combined with long life expectancies, the dying process has been elongated. 3For those who are suffering it has been harder and harder to die not only because of our technological advances in the medical field but also because of our ...read more.

Middle

created a precedent by allowing Mrs Z to travel to Switzerland to be euthanized different to the Pretty v UK in that the assisted death is within a controlled environment overseas in Switzerland instead of assisted death by her husband . 18After she was psychologically tested and shown to have the mental competence to decide for herself, she was able to travel to Switzerland to die.19 In a Postal survey by Khuse , Singer, Baume , Clark and Rickard of Australian doctors in July 1996 published in the Medical Journal of Australia in 1997. They compared results with the Netherland a country similar to Australia except that euthanasia was legal. The proportion of all Australian deaths that resulted from voluntary euthanasia was about 1.8% , 0.1% were from physician assisted suicide and the proportion of all deaths resulting from non voluntary euthanasia was 3.5%. A recent survey by Douglas et al. revealed even higher levels of voluntary and non voluntary euthanasia. 20While in the Netherlands a survey by the government committee headed by PJ van der Maas reported that in 1990 approximately 1.7% of all deaths were the result of voluntary euthanasia and the 0.2% was the result of physician-assisted suicide. 21Additionally there were 1000 cases (which amounted to 0.8% of all deaths) of non-voluntary euthanasia-death were patients were intentionally killed without the patient's request. 22 Not only does the results show that Euthanasia still exists in Australia where euthanasia is illegal but a small percentage of patients are terminated without consent. ...read more.

Conclusion

12 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 13 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 14 Diane Pretty makes final 'death with dignity' plea. London: The Guardian, c2002. http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2002/mar/20/health.uknews 15 Diane Pretty makes final 'death with dignity' plea. London: The Guardian, c2002. http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2002/mar/20/health.uknews 16 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 17 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 18 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 19 Brooks- Gordon, Belinda et al. Death Rites and Rights. Portland: Hart Publishing, 2007. 20 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 21 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 22 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 23 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 24 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 25 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 26 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 27 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 28 Amarasekara, K. & Bagaric, M. (2002) Euthanasia, morality and the law, New York: Peter Lang. 29 Otlowski, Margaret. Voluntary Euthanasia and the Common Law. United States: Oxford University Press, 1997. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Law section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Law essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Law - Resulting trusts

    4 star(s)

    Where as if a wife who transfers to her husband, or mother or daughter will be successful. The law commission decided that too many unjust decisions were passing the courts by and decided to look at reform of these principles.

  2. Criminal Law (Offences against the person) - revision notes

    (unlike murder) Involuntary manslaughter isdn pot an offence that you can be charged with. It is the product of being charged with murder and successfully pleading one of the defences above. During the trail of murder the defendant has to plead of the defences by making a submission to the judge.

  1. Study the concept of Reasonable man and reasonability in tort law.

    The judge M.Venkatachlia put an end to this controversy in his judgment quoting Professor Wade saying that "This is not therefore the standard of 'the man on the Claphani omnibus'. It is the standard indicated by a true construction of the Act which distinguishes between what the statutory authority may or may not be authorised to do so".

  2. Should Capital Punishment be enforced

    I don't think that's right. I think the reason to support the death penalty is because it saves other people's lives." These people believe that every life is precious, and holds a certain value, despite any sins that one may have committed, and hence, one should not be executed for their mistakes.

  1. Does Hart's theory differ to the 'gunman writ large' situation?

    Hence the command theory is content-independent describing rules as posited by the sovereign. Hart's account is another example, in his case the rules are based on practices. The practice theory of norms is flawed, argues Raz. The practice theory i.e.

  2. Worlds Apart: Orientalism, Antifeminism, and Heresy in Chaucer's Man of Law's Tale

    The Man of Law points to the sultaness's relationship to Boccaccio's figure in the epithet "virago" that he couples with "Semiramis" (II.359). As the fifteenth- century poet Gavin Douglas defined the term, a "virago" is not simply a large or quarrelsome woman, but like Juturna in the Aeneid, "a woman exersand a mannis office."

  1. To what extent has the Human Rights Act 1998 strengthened the rule of law ...

    be the more complete, whole version of the concept of the rule since it incorporates some formal tenets too.11 Put simply, it is not just a question of having a system of laws, but they need to be exercised within certain standards of justice.

  2. Lay People

    However, the 15 mile rule doesn't help if not enough ethnic people want to become magistrates. Only about 6% of all Lay Magistrates are from an ethnic background and 94% from a white middle-aged background according to a census of lay magistrates in 2002.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work