• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Importance of Law in Our Society

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Kate Finnin, Enh2 The Importance of Law in Our Society What is the importance of law today? In order to establish this we must first establish what the point of law is. Law and order is essential in all communities. In an orderly law-abiding community people can plan ahead, work in safety and do business in trust. In most modern societies order means stability. The guarantees of this order take place in the form of laws. Laws are rules and customs that the citizens of a community regard as binding upon them and can be enforced by the courts. Laws provide boundaries so that people realise where and when they are committing an offence. One of the principal objects of the law is to safeguard the rights of citizens, us. Our basic rights are what give us our freedom in daily life. The freedom of speech, the right to a fair trial, personal freedom etc, these are all outlined in the Republic of Irelands written constitution, which protects us, the people here today. ...read more.

Middle

They also pass certain laws that did not appear on the constitution, such as the smoking ban and divorce. Also marriages would not be legal if laws were not in place, I can tell there are a lot of divorced men out there who are hating the law right now, but there are many different aspects of the law that we just don't consider. The whole point of law isn't punishment; it's protection, be that physical, which is controlled by the Garda�, or otherwise. Consumers, for instance are protected by acts such as The Consumers Information Act, which outlines the duties of the retailer to the consumer and The Sale of Goods and Supply of Services Act, which outlines the consumers rights. Laws and acts against drugs and other substances did not originally appear on the constitution, but developed over time when problems increasingly arose. Many people don't believe the problems that drugs can cause and believe that laws should be passed so that they can become legal, i.e. ...read more.

Conclusion

One cannot finish a day without hearing about a crime. Each and every day a murder or an attack has been carried out or a group of houses or buildings have been broken into. Policemen and women return to work everyday and put their lives on the line in order to protect ours, but each day they get abused or mocked because certain people have lost faith in their legal system. Children are now being brought up to believe that the police are nothing but 'pigs'. The abusage of the law is at an all time high and unfortunately the people abusing the law fail to believe that they are forcing the need for it to be increased, quite literally, daily. If offenders would just realise that laws are necessary for the progression and production of a country then the need for the protection and sense of security obtained from the legal system would significantly decrease. I also find it quite ironic that the independence and way of living that so many people died for during, and for many centuries after, the Irish Revolution, is now being detested and rejected. It doesn't seem fair, does it? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Law section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Law essays

  1. Should guns be banned in America?

    The only people ever affected by gun laws are peaceful, law abiding citizens, who never abuse their firearms right. Recent research is finding gun laws do not reduce the amount of violent crime in our society.

  2. Criminal Law (Offences against the person) - revision notes

    Frightening the victim to death R v Towers (1874) - Towers assaulted a woman carrying a baby (in her arms). Woman screamed and the baby cried to its death (2 weeks later) Guilty of involuntary manslaughter (unlawful act) R v Hayward (1908) - Hayward went home to beat his wife and she ran outside onto the road, collapsed and then he kicked her in the arm.

  1. What is an indictable offence and how is it brought to trial?

    can be declared ineffective insofar as they transgress any directly applicable rules of European law. The traditional view expressed by Dicey and others is that Parliament is sovereign and can make or unmake any law on any subject whatsoever, without legal constraints.

  2. Property, Liberty, and the Law

    Since CropDesign is a European company they face different Patent rules and laws. For example, the European patent system takes between seven to ten years while the United States Patent system can be granted within three years. European patent markets usually question the United States' method.

  1. Should Capital Punishment be enforced

    If this is properly conducted, it can be considered humane. This is carried out by breaking the neck, and the time taken for death varies depending on the free-fall distance. Intoxicating one with poisonous gas, or otherwise known as the lethal gas method is currently used in six states, including California and Arizona.

  2. The Law Relating to Negotiable Instruments

    notice of dishonor, notice of protest must be given by the notary public. When noting is equivalent to Protest (Sec. 104A): When a bill or note is required to be protested within a certain time or proceeding, it is sufficient if the bill or note is noted within that time or proceeding; the formal protest may be issued later.

  1. Should juvenile offenders be treated differently to adult offenders?

    Juvenile offender rates have decreased from 1996/97 to 2003/04 from 3965 to 3023 per 100 000 per year. It then increased in 2005/06 and increased again in 2006/07 to 3532. However, the adult offender rate peaked in 2000/01 at 2100 per 100 000, in 2006/07 it was 1492 per 100 000 the lowest rate recorded.

  2. Lay People

    A person may be disqualified from becoming a magistrate if they have any serious criminal convictions, if they are bankrupt or are members of the armed forces or police. The idea of the selection process is to create a panel representative of all sections of society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work