• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Law
  • Word count: 2500

There are four different types of law, criminal, civil, common and statuate. In this first task I will explain briefly each one.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Task 1 There are four different types of law, criminal, civil, common and statuate. In this first task I will explain briefly each one: Criminal Law: This is the kind of law that the police enforce. Murder, assault, robbery and rape are all included within the boundaries of criminal law. A good way in which to summarise which offences come under criminal law is 'an offence which is seen as being against everybody, even though it is not'. For example if a car is stolen, then the theft is against the individual, but it threatens all car owners because they might have their car stolen. Because the view is taken that everybody is threatened by the crime, criminal law is dealt with by the public services and not by private layers or investigators. Civil Law: Civil law has many different areas enclosed in it. Examples that come under this law are legal rights, such as a right to an education or to a trade union membership and divorce problems, such as how the furniture is split between the couple and who receives custody of the children. The best way to describe it is that it looks at actions that are not crimes. In civil law it is up to the individuals to sort out their own problems by going to court themselves, or with a lawyer. Where in criminal law the state makes sure that justice is done weather the defendant wants to go to court or not. ...read more.

Middle

The magistrates will enter; there could be I magistrate or three depending on what happens. One magistrate is called a stipendiary how is paid for his or her job and has a better understanding of law. If there are three magistrates then this is called a lay bench that consists of three unqualified individuals that haven't a great understanding of law, so they have to be advised by a clerk. Lay bench magistrates are not paid. From then the court proceedings will be quite straightforward. Initially the usher will lead the first witness to the witness box where he or she will ask then to place there right hand on a holy book and reciting an oath to say that you will tell the truth in court. Then the prosecuting lawyer will ask the witness questions followed by the defence lawyer. After all of the witnesses have been questioned the court will then adjourn for the magistrates to form the punishment. If it is a lay bench then the clerk, who has a greater understanding of law, will accompany them to help them come to the right decision. When the court re-adjourns the magistrates will give their punishment, which could be anything for a small fine to six months in prison. So now that you have wrote this letter I hope that you feel more secure about what will happen at your trial. ...read more.

Conclusion

Then the barristers, who have degrees in law and additional training, and their solicitors, who do the paperwork for the barristers, both the defence and the prosecuting will enter and be seated. The whole court will rise as the judge enters to take his seat; the judge has a very high understanding of law because to become a judge you need to have been a barrister first. The judge is there to make sure that the law is upheld and to direct the jury if necessary, but his most important job is that he or she will have to find the best possible punishment for the accused if they are found guilty. From there the first witness will be lead in and shown to the witness box by the usher, were they will have to place there right hand upon a holy book and recite an oath that is to stop them from lying to the court. First the prosecuting barrister will be the first to question the witness about what happened followed by the defence lawyer. Once all of the witnesses have been seen then the court will adjourn for the judge to make his decision. When the court re-adjourns the judge will give his verdict which could mean that the accused will either be lead to the cells if guilty, or set free if innocent. Yours Sincerely JOSH BENTHAM 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Law section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Law essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Distinguish Criminal law from Civil law in the English Legal System. Outline the jurisdiction ...

    4 star(s)

    Most have a divorce jurisdiction. A person convicted in the Crown Court may appeal either against sentence or conviction to the Court of Appeal, which may actually increase sentence. There cannot be an appeal against an acquittal by a jury although the attorney general may refer such a case to the Court of Appeal, which

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Judicial precedent.

    3 star(s)

    The appeal court will then substitute its own decision. Thus, the appeal court disagrees with the point of law that decided the matter in the lower court and gives the decision in favour of a different party. (Disapproving; in a later case, without overruling the earlier case, a higher court gives its opinion that the earlier case was wrongly decided.

  1. The Difference between Civil Law and Criminal Law

    because it applies to all Canadians and regulates relationships within our society. Similarly, civil law is sometimes referred to as private law because it regulates private relationships between individuals in our society. You are not alone in being confused about how a person acquitted of murder in a criminal trial

  2. Should Capital Punishment be enforced

    In other words, killing convicted murderers will satisfy the need for justice and or vengeance. One major question to take into consideration when dealing with the capital punishment is, Does capital punishment an effective deterrence for heinous crimes? With some statistics showing that capital punishment does not deter crimes, other statistics show that it does, causing conflicting arguments.

  1. Worlds Apart: Orientalism, Antifeminism, and Heresy in Chaucer's Man of Law's Tale

    call the "permanently unstable" position of intimacy with Christianity and hence demanded resolution. Typically, Christian polemicists and other western writers suggested that the problem posed by Islam's proximity might be solved in one of two related ways: either by fully assimilating Islam to Christianity or by exposing it as a diabolical plot and altogether rejecting it.

  2. Distinction Between Criminal And Civil Law.

    The person or business making the claim starts civil cases. Thirdly, the terminology used is different. A defendant in a criminal case is found guilty or not guilty whereas a defendant in a civil case is found liable or not liable.

  1. Criminal Law (Offences against the person) - revision notes

    Provocation 1957 Homicide Act s3 3. Suicide Pact 1957 Homicide Act s4 However there are 3 defences, only the first 2 will be used as in our syllabus suicide pact is not seen. Murder + Specific defence = Voluntary manslaughter * Voluntary manslaughter may not seen a fair swap from the charge of murder, as if

  2. Describe the main differences between solicitors and barristers with regard to training and work ...

    The main advantage of fusing the two professions is it reduces the costs that a client has to pay to have their case represented. Currently a client has to pay two fees, one for their solicitor the other for their barrister as it is usually necessary to hire both, the

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work