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To what extent do you feel that human beings need rules in order to be moral, and to what extent do you feel they should be free to adapt their behavior to different situations? Be specific, giving examples and illustrations.

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Introduction

To what extent do you feel that human beings need rules in order to be moral, and to what extent do you feel they should be free to adapt their behavior to different situations? Be specific, giving examples and illustrations. There is a limit to everything we do, and more often than not, in my opinion, many things in life require common sense and rationale more than moral rules. One simple example is this. A man, M, from the city is driving through a village to get to another town. On his way, he accidentally knocks down a chicken. Coincidentally, that very chicken happened to be the pride of the village as it held a certain symbolic function. ...read more.

Middle

Therefore, this shows to what extent human beings ought to adapt their behavior in such circumstances, and when they are forced to put morality aside temporary. The current condition of Iraq is another fine example. Right after the President Bush administration declared war against Saddam and his minions, there was nothing but complete chaos throughout the land. The hordes of people that once thronged the bustling streets of Baghdad once followed law and order established by the country. People can safely perform their daily routines and end their days peacefully. When war was waged against the nation, there had been total unrest amongst the people. Law and order can no longer preserve the good behavior and nature of the citizens anymore. ...read more.

Conclusion

Even though situations have drastically changed over the period of the war and rules don't really matter to anybody, people are deadly quick in adapting their behavior in that kind of situation. I guessed it can't be helped as the situation there has become so tense that a slight mistake made would even cost them their lives. As people always say, "Rules are meant to be broken" .... This is an undeniable fact for the Iraqi people as they think that since their government has been toppled, rules can no longer bog them down. They are free and willing to do whatever they please. If I were to be caught in that kind of predicament, I would have no choice but to follow the majority, as the clich´┐Ż goes, "If you can't beat them, join them". ...read more.

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