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Will Law

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Introduction

Will Law A will is a legal document through which a person bequeaths his absolute properties, both immovable and movable to others. In this case, John who executes the will is called the testator, and has the major and sound mind to make the decision. John' sister and his brother-in-law are the beneficiaries for this case. Under the Wills Act, they are called the legatees who can be relations or even strangers. A will comes into effect after the death of the testator, but can be changed by the testator if required. Obviously, John has the concern for the succession of his property after he dies. If he dies without a Will, or dies "intestate" as the law calls it, the property of the decedent is distributed according to a formula fixed by law. In other words, if you don't make a Will, you don't have any say about how your property will be distributed. ...read more.

Middle

If you try to change your existing will by writing on it, the changes will likely not Ask your lawyer to send you a reminder to have your will reviewed every three to five years. Answer to Question 3 This is a question involving technicalities in contract law, consideration, human rights and property law. It is axiomatic to recognize the fact that Peter has a legal obligation not to follow Mary deliberately (and she would almost be sure of invoking such a defence), but her request for him not to stay in the same city is could be viewed as way above that obligation and thus if Peter does go to the extent of moving away from the city, he could very well have given to her a practical benefit sufficient enough to effect consideration. This however, would only be recognized by the courts as consideration if his acts fulfill the requirement of economic value. ...read more.

Conclusion

If one of the parties to an illegal agreement is ignorant of the facts making the agreement illegal, and the agreement appears to be an ordinary agreement, the courts may permit the ignorant party to sue the other for damages. Illegality of any part of an agreement is ordinarily held to make the entire agreement void and unenforceable. However, it may be possible through terms severing the legal and illegal portions to secure partial recovery. If a contract provided for delivery of legal and illegal goods, and they were priced separately, the seller may be able to collect for the legal goods. The court may view the situation as if there were two contracts. The illegal contract would be void but the legal contract would not be void. Conclusion As it is an illegal contract from the very beginning that the entire agreement is void and unenforceable, and Peter is innocent as well. It is not reasonable from Peter to sue Mary for the damage ...read more.

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