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A garden centre sells square slabs which can be used to surround ponds

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Introduction

A garden centre sells square slabs which can be used to surround ponds.

Aim = To investigate how many slabs are needed to surround a square pond.

To investigate my aim I will need to use the formula for the perimeter of a square.

I have been told that a square pond with the dimensions of 1x1 needs 8 slabs, a square pond with the dimensions of 2x2 needs 12 and a square pond when the dimensions are 3x3 16 slabs are needed.

Knowing the answers to the first few sizes and also knowing that I will have to work out the perimeter of the pond.

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Middle

image02.png

In slabs. image02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.pngimage02.png

Corners are then

Added in.

This then makes 20 slabs.                        (Not to scale, slabs would be same size)

To prove my formula is correct I will show how many slabs are needed when the sides are from 1m – 14m.

As you can see the slabs needed add on four to each last one. If a person was to come into the garden centre and ask how many slabs they would need for a pond that has the length and width

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Conclusion

2x2 = 4                        2x1 = 2image08.png

4+2 = 6

Four more needed for the slabs, so 6+4 = 10. The amount of slabs

Formula

= 2l+2w

= 4lw+4

= Slabs needed.

These are just examples.image10.png

Using easy formulas and equations can help the garden centre to work out how many slabs are needed to go around a square or rectangular pond. The customer could give the employee a size of the shape and the employee can work it out, by working out the perimeter of the shape of the pond and then add four onto that.

The reason why four has to be added on to the answer of the perimeter is because the perimeter only works out the sides, the four to be added on is the corners.

By – Tim Royle

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