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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1045

A Martian Mushroom starts off as a square.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Page

image00.png

image01.png

image08.png

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

A Martian Mushroom starts off as a square.

image09.png

The next day it grows so that a new square half the length of the original square is added to each side.

image03.png

Then the next day each of these squares increases by a new square half the length of yesterdays.image05.png

I am going to investigate the formula for the growth in area of a martian mushroom. I will begin by drawing the diagrams for the first four days of growth.

Day 1

image10.pngimage09.png

                Area = 162image10.png

Area = 256cm2

Day 2

image03.pngimage02.pngimage02.png

                                        Area = 162 + 4(82)

                                        Area = 256 + 256

                                        Area = 512cm2

Day 3image04.pngimage05.png

                                        Area = 162 + 4(82) + 4(42)

                                        Area = 256 + 256 + 64                                                                Area = 576cm2

Day 4

image06.png

Area = 162 + 4(82) + 4(42) + 4(22)                Area = 256 + 256 + 64 + 16                        Area = 592cm2

I am now going to have a look at the areas to see if there is a pattern to them.

Day

Sum of Area

Total Area

1

256

256

2

256 + 256

512

3

256 + 256 + 64

576

4

256 + 256 +64 + 16

592

I have noticed that each time you add on  of the previous number.

...read more.

Middle

597.3333282

15

256 + 256 + 64 + 16 + 4 + 1 +  +  + 1/64 + 1/256 + 1/1024 + 1/4096 + 1/16384 + 1/65536 + 1/262144

597.3333321

16

256 + 256 + 64 + 16 + 4 + 1 +  +  + 1/64 + 1/256 + 1/1024 + 1/4096 + 1/16384 + 1/65536 + 1/262144 + 1/1048576

597.3333331

17

256 + 256 + 64 + 16 + 4 + 1 +  +  + 1/64 + 1/256 + 1/1024 + 1/4096 + 1/16384 + 1/65536 + 1/262144 + 1/1048576 + 1/4194304

597.3333333

18

256 + 256 + 64 + 16 + 4 + 1 +  +  + 1/64 + 1/256 + 1/1024 + 1/4096 + 1/16384 + 1/65536 + 1/262144 + 1/1048576 + 1/4194304 + 1/16777216

597.3333333

The maximum surface area for a martian mushroom that starts off as 16cm by 16cm is 597cm2

From this information I can investigate the formula for martian mushrooms.

I looked in the ‘A’ level book “Pure Mathematics 1” and found some formulas that work for this pattern…

To find the sum of the areas for a particular day, I found the formula

image11.png. Because in my investigation I have included the first term where it is not in the pattern, I will also have to add on 256, so the formula is actually image11.png+256. Here are the substitutes…

a=Area of original shape i.e. the added area on day 2, because day 1 is not in the         pattern.

r=ratio. I mentioned previously that I am adding on a quarter of the         original area each time.  This therefore, is the ratio.

...read more.

Conclusion

As before, I will have to add image13.png to the end of this formula to make it work in this series.

I will now try to prove that the formula works…

image37.png+image38.png

This should equal the total area of the Martian mushroom after 3 days.

I will work this out to see if it is so…

image39.png        Here I have worked out the brackets, and started to solve the top half of the left side of the equation.

=image40.png        I have solved the top half of the left side of the equation.

=image41.png        Here I have multiplied the right hand side by 192, to get 768 as the common        denominator.

=image42.png                        I have now added the two sides together.

=image44.png                        This is the simplified equation.

After the equation has been worked out and simplified, it equals image44.png, which is what I got before! This is proof that the equation does work for any geometric series of this kind, and the end of my coursework.

Dale Caffull

10 - 4

...read more.

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