• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An Experiment Investigating the Factors Affecting the Energy Transfer Involved In a Bouncing Ball

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

June, 2002Suzannah Lipmann

Physics Coursework

An Experiment Investigating the Factors Affecting the Energy Transfer Involved In a Bouncing Ball

Planning

Factors affecting the energy of the ball bouncing are the height it is dropped from, the type of ball, e.g. is it bouncy or hard, the weight of the ball, and the height it is dropped from.  The energy transfer is as follows:

As it drops it has gravitational potential energy, and then as it is falling it has kinetic energy when it lands it has elastic potential energy and as it bounces back upwards it has kinetic energy again.  Energy is also lost through heat and sound.

        I decided to use one type of ball, so the weight was constant.  And the height it was dropped from, therefore I dropped it from a range of different heights so as to get a wide variety of results.  The range was from 200 centimetres to 20 centimetres, measured at 20 centimetre intervals.

        My hypothesis is that

...read more.

Middle

Energy Loss (%) (2dp)

168.18

12.57

71.33

68

64

69.33

68

56

Method To Preliminary Experiment

My method involved the apparatus being set up.  I used one stand with a clamp, and two metre rules stuck together, one on top of another.  The most bouncy of three golf balls was chosen, and were dropped from a series of different heights, three times each to obtain an average.

Apparatus

Method

The clamp was placed on the work top, and two metre rules stuck together were clamped to the stand on place.  Once a range of different heights was decided, the golf ball was dropped from each of them by someone else so I could read off the height that the ball bounced back to accurately.  The ball was dropped from the same height three times so an average could be taken, and to make sure there were no anomalies, it was done for accuracy.  Also to make sure it was a fair test, I made sure the result I was reading off was

...read more.

Conclusion

        I think my procedure was suitable and I don’t think any changes in particular could have been made to improve the experiment.  I do think that I could have investigated more into the gravity or interference with the ball bouncing back as high as it was dropped from at high heights, I could have checked if this would have continued in this way if I had dropped the ball from a few more greater heights.

        I do think the evidence was good enough to support my conclusion, as it showed me that there must be something interfering with the ball bouncing back so high when it was dropped from such a height.    

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations essays

  1. Investigate the effect of temperature on the bounce height of a squash ball.

    This proves my prediction right as not only can you see from the results that the bounce height increases as the temperature increases, you can then see from these results that it must be due to the gas inside the ball heating up, causing the volume of the gas to

  2. Physics Coursework: Bouncing Balls.

    Liveliness of ball Very good Very Poor Good Variation in bounce height Good Very Poor Good Ease of measurement Easy Very Poor Easy Tennis Ball: Floor Type Concrete Carpet Wood Liveliness of ball Not bad Poor Not bad Variation in bounce height Poor Poor Poor Ease of measurement Hard Very

  1. My physics coursework is an experiment with gravity. The experiment is done by creating ...

    But what if I did something wrong in the experiment without realising it? What if the results are wrong? To find this out I carried out another series of tests in exactly the same way as the last ones and here are the results from them.

  2. Does the height of a ball affect the diameter of the crater where it ...

    What I will do is, will set up my equipment that is shown in the diagram above. I will drop the steel ball into the sand from where the clamp is set to (selected locations). I will then use a caliph to make accurate measurements of the diameter of the crater that is left in the sand.

  1. Investigation of the formation of Craters (energy)

    And to eliminate sand on the workbenches a try will be placed under the stand and box of sand. Method: Below are the step by step instructions by which our group of two people had done the experiment: 1. Get out all the apparatus required to conduct the experiment, as

  2. What relationship is there between the height a table tennis ball is dropped from ...

    + 2as v2 = 2as v2 = 2 x 9.81 x 100 v2 = 1962 v = V1962 v = 44.29 ms-1 Preliminary * Clamp Stand * Clamp * Metre rule * Table tennis ball * Hard surface I performed a preliminary investigation in which I dropped a table tennis

  1. What factors affect the bounce height of a squash ball

    to fit my prediction well, although I feel for my main experiment I could conduct it with a greater degree of accuracy. I will record three bounce height measurements, in order to achieve an average. From this I can discount anomalies with ease.

  2. "Oxidation is the loss of electrons. Oxidising agent removes electrons from something else."[1]

    X O-H 5 O-H N?N 945.00 3 X C-O 3 N?N C-H 413.00 2 X C-C 0.5 O=O C-O 358.00 TOTAL 8009 TOTAL -10234 C=O 805.00 C-C 347.00 BOND BROKEN + BOND FORMED N-O 214.00 =-2225 /KJ mol-1 N=O 287.00 You can see that the total enthalpy for the explosion of nitroglycerine is -2225.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work