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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 2098

Analyse three different types of newspaper, for example one Broadsheet, one Tabloid and one Local Paper, to see which is the hardest to read.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction

In this project I am going to analyse three different types of newspaper, for example one Broadsheet, one Tabloid and one Local Paper, to see which is the hardest to read. I will do this by randomly selecting sentences in these newspapers and counting the words in each sentence. This should give me a results table about which news paper is the hardest to read as generally the more words in a sentence, the harder it is to read. I could also separate the sentences into different categories such as News, Entertainment and Sport. I must however buy my newspapers all on the same day as they will be more or less all oaring the same stories, therefore will be using the same sort of vocabulary. However, I must first do a pre-test. I will do

...read more.

Middle

Number of Words x Frequency

FX

6

1

6

7

0

0

8

0

0

9

2

18

10

3

30

11

4

44

12

3

36

13

4

52

14

5

70

15

1

15

16

3

48

17

5

85

18

1

18

19

2

38

20

0

0

21

2

42

22

0

0

23

4

92

24

7

168

25

1

25

26

0

0

27

6

162

28

7

196

29

5

145

30

4

120

31

1

31

32

7

224

33

1

33

34

3

102

35

2

70

36

0

0

37

5

185

38

0

0

39

4

150

40

3

120

Total

96

2331

Lowest Number of Words = 6

Highest Number of Words = 40

Lower Quartile = 16

Higher Quartile = 32

Median = 25

Entertainment

Pages                         13 x 180 = 41

                        56

Number of Words

X

Frequency

F

Number of Words x Frequency

FX

6

1

6

7

0

0

8

1

8

9

0

0

10

0

0

11

2

22

12

1

12

13

1

13

14

0

0

15

4

60

16

0

0

17

2

34

18

0

0

19

3

57

20

0

0

21

2

42

22

0

0

23

1

46

24

5

120

25

6

150

26

2

52

27

7

189

28

0

0

29

2

58

30

1

30

Total

41

859

Lowest Number of Words = 6

Highest Number of Words = 30

Lower Quartile = 17

Higher Quartile = 26

Median =24

Sport

Pages                         13 x 180 = 41

                        56

Number of Words

X

Frequency

F

Number of Words x Frequency

FX

6

1

6

7

0

0

8

0

6

9

1

9

10

0

0

11

0

0

12

2

24

13

0

0

14

0

0

15

4

60

16

0

0

17

0

0

18

5

90

19

0

0

20

0

0

21

2

42

22

0

0

23

7

161

24

0

0

25

6

150

26

8

208

27

4

108

28

0

0

29

0

0

30

1

30

Total

41

888

Lowest Number of Words = 6

Highest Number of Words = 30

Lower Quartile = 18

Higher Quartile = 26

Median =23

The Sunday Telegraph

News

Pages                         28 x 180 = 99

                        51

Number of Words

X

Frequency

F

Number of Words x Frequency

FX

4

1

4

5

1

5

6

0

0

7

2

14

8

3

24

9

0

0

10

2

20

11

1

11

12

0

0

13

5

52

14

0

0

15

3

45

16

2

32

17

2

34

18

0

18

19

4

76

20

2

20

21

2

21

22

3

44

23

3

69

24

4

96

25

4

25

26

6

156

27

0

0

28

6

168

29

3

87

30

2

30

31

2

62

32

4

128

33

9

297

34

0

0

35

6

210

36

5

180

37

4

148

38

3

38

39

3

117

40

2

80

Total

99

2432

...read more.

Conclusion

Analysis

After examining the results, I can see that in most cases, the news section is harder to read than the entertainment or Sport. However, in the Herald Express, the entertainment section is the hardest. I can also see that throughout all the newspapers, the sentence length is always mainly longer sentences rather than shorter ones. I will now examine the box plots of the categories in comparison to the same categories in a different newspaper.

Analysis

The Box plots show that the entertainment sections of all newspapers are basically the same. There are only slight differences. The Sports interquartile ranges show that they are basically the same although the medians are very different. The news sections are basically the same except for the Herald Express which is an anomaly.

Conclusion

I think the results show, as I predicted, that the Sunday Telegraph is the hardest to read. However, all papers are very similar.

...read more.

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