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Analysis of words per sentence in differeent Newspapers.

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Introduction

ANALYSIS OF WORDS PER SENTENCE HISTOGRAMS My histograms are pictorial representations of my data and they give a sense of distribution. They are qualitative descriptions of my data and allow me to see if my data is skewed or not. * The Times shows no signs of skewness and have no peculiarities. * The Express also shows no signs of skewness and have no peculiarities. * The Mirror is slightly positively skewed. This means that there are more small values than large values. However, there are no peculiarities in my results. CUMULATIVE FREQUENCY POLYGONS Cumulative frequency polygons are used to work out accurate quartiles (lower quartile, upper quartile and the median) and the inter-quartile range, which allowed me to work out the spread of data. In order of increasing inter-quartile range The Times The Express The Mirror * The Times has the smallest inter-quartile range. ...read more.

Middle

BOX AND WHISKER PLOTS My box and whisker plots show the spread of data (the upper quartile and the lower quartile) and the median. Both the whiskers represent 25% of the data and both the regions of the box represent 25%. * The Times is slightly positively skewed * The Express is very slightly negatively skewed * The Mirror is positively skewed. From my box and whisker plots (and my cumulative frequency polygons) I can see that my results match my hypothesis because each paper has a median in the correct increasing order: In order of increasing median (and increasing difficulty in readability) The Mirror The Express The Times 18.5 words per sentence 21.5 words per sentence 22.5 words per sentence In my case, the median was the most appropriate average to use because my data was skewed, which meant that there were values for certain results which I wanted to ignore in my comparison, as they were likely to be outliers and distort the mean. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that a typical sentence in The Times is only 1 word longer than a typical sentence in The Express. Even though this supports my hypothesis, this is a very surprisingly small difference and this suggests that the two papers are nearly equally difficult to read, which is not what I expected. Although I have worked out the standard deviation, I used the inter-quartile range for the measure of spread of data, because my data was skewed, which meant that there are values for certain results which I wanted to ignore in my comparison, as they were likely to be outliers and distort the standard deviation. In order of increasing inter-quartile range The Times The Express The Mirror 7.5 8 9 Like the median, there is not much difference between the inter-quartile ranges of the papers. It is also a surprise that The Mirror has the largest inter-quartile range. But this data does show that the spread of all The Times sentences is much more pronounced than The Express and The Mirror. ...read more.

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