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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 4480

Compare the readability of three newspapers, a broadsheet (The Times), an informative tabloid (Daily Mail), and a tabloid (Daily Mirror).

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

By Samuel Bell Data Handling Coursework Newspaper Comparisons Aim: In this coursework I am going to compare the readability of three newspapers, a broadsheet (The Times), an informative tabloid (Daily Mail), and a tabloid (Daily Mirror.) Hypothesis: 1) In this coursework I predict that broadsheet newspapers use longer words than tabloid newspapers 2) In this coursework I predict that broad sheet newspapers have longer sentences than tabloid newspapers. Planning: In my coursework I am going to look at three different newspapers. These are different types: Broadsheet and Tabloids. This will give me a reliable source to compare my results with. I purchased these three papers on Thursday, March 18th 2004. I chose Thursday because it will have normal news. Whereas on a Saturday or Monday there will be more sport or entertainment. This may affect the readability as it will be targeted at a particular audience, not just general. I have taken these papers from the same day. This will make the investigation fairer as there will be no extra news (e.g. sport on Monday.) Also the articles will be similar stories so it will be a fair comparison. I will divide the newspapers into four sections: News, Entertainment, Sport, and Other. This will give me a fair, wide range of results. After I have counted how many pages are in each section, I will use Stratified sampling. Stratified sampling will allow me to determine how many words I will randomly select from each section. I will use simple random sampling. To do this I will use the Ran# button on my calculator to select a page from a section. I will do the same for number of articles on that page, then paragraphs and finally a word. This will be my starting point. From there I will count the amount of words I have worked out using stratified sampling. If I come to the end of the article, I will go back to the top and carry on counting there. ...read more.

Middle

I will now collect my sample for the Mirror: The Mirror: Word length (News section) Number of letters Tally: Frequency 1 2 2 6 3 3 4 10 5 3 6 5 7 3 8 3 9 0 10 1 11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 Total: 36 36 is the correct amount of words that I needed to collect from the news section. The Mirror: Word length (Sport section) Number of letters Tally: Frequency 1 2 2 2 3 4 4 2 5 1 6 1 7 2 8 2 9 0 10 1 11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 Total: 17 17 is the correct amount of words that I needed to collect from the sport section. The Mirror: Word length (Entertainment section) Number of letters Tally: Frequency 1 1 2 5 3 3 4 6 5 0 6 3 7 3 8 1 9 3 10 0 11 0 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 Total: 25 25 is the correct amount of words that I needed to collect from the entertainment section. The Mirror: Word length (Other section) Number of letters Tally: Frequency 1 1 2 4 3 4 4 3 5 4 6 1 7 2 8 2 9 0 10 0 11 1 12 0 13 0 14 0 15 0 Total 22 23 is the correct amount of words that I needed to collect from the other section. I have now collected my sample of 100 words from each newspaper. I am going to collect the data together for each newspaper and present the data in ordered stem and leaf diagrams, this is because no data is lost and its is easy to find the median and quartiles. After each stem and leaf I will work out the statistical measures To calculate the median (Q2) I will use the equation 1/2 (n+1), n stands for sample size. This number will be rounded to the nearest whole number. ...read more.

Conclusion

F(frequency) fx x� fx� 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 4 4 3 1 3 9 9 4 2 8 16 64 5 0 0 25 0 6 5 30 36 900 7 6 42 49 1764 8 5 40 64 1600 9 5 45 81 2025 10 9 90 100 8100 11 9 99 121 9801 12 8 96 144 9216 13 10 130 169 16900 14 6 84 196 7056 15 7 105 225 11025 16 4 64 256 4096 17 2 34 289 1156 18 6 108 324 11664 19 4 76 361 5776 20 3 60 400 3600 21 5 105 441 11025 22 1 22 484 484 23 0 0 529 0 24 0 0 576 0 25 0 0 625 0 26 0 0 676 0 27 0 0 729 0 28 1 28 784 784 Total: 100 1271 7714 107049 Standard deviation: 30.14872966 Cumulative frequency graphs I will now present my data in cumulative frequency graphs. This will allow me to make clear comparisons. I am going to hand draw them to ensure the greatest accuracy and precision. I will also draw these graphs on the same axis; this will make comparisons clear and simple. The Times Word length, x Frequency Cumulative frequency 0<x<10 5 5 10<x<20 27 32 20<x<30 47 79 30<x<40 16 95 40<x<50 5 100 The Daily Mail Word length, x Frequency Cumulative frequency 0<x<10 9 9 10<x<20 54 63 20<x<30 32 95 30<x<40 4 99 40<x<50 1 100 The Mirror Word length, x Frequency Cumulative frequency 0<x<10 34 34 10<x<20 59 93 20<x<30 7 100 30<x<40 0 0 40<x<50 0 0 Data interpretation for hypothesis two: The standard deviation clearly shows that on average the Times has the longest sentences and also that the Mirror has the shortest. This clearly shows that my hypothesis was correct. The Times had a much higher distribution of data than the Daily Mail and the Mirror. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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