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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1534

Comparing a tabloid newspaper with a broadsheet newspaper.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Muazzam Chaudhri.image01.png

Candidate number 9048.

Centre number

image00.png

In this maths coursework pupils were given the following question:

I will be concentrating on Newspapers rather than magazines. However I will be comparing a tabloid newspaper with a broadsheet newspaper.

Hypothesis.

 I believe that the reading age needed to read a broadsheet is higher than that needed for a tabloid. For example the words are longer in a broadsheet than those used in a tabloid. There is a lower percentage of space (area) used for advertisements and photographs in broadsheets in comparison with tabloids.

Introduction.

 There are two main types of newspapers: tabloids and broadsheets. Tabloids are easier to read and give opinions in their articles. Broadsheets state the facts and let the reader interpret them in their own way. Tabloids often concentrate on news about stars. Broadsheets are bigger than tabloids, their style of writing is more formal. I will be investigating whether it is easier to read a tabloid or a broadsheet, I will come to a conclusion to the readability of both papers by counting the length of the words in the two types of newspapers.

...read more.

Middle

10

4

98

11

1

99

12

0

99

13

1

100

14

0

100

Mean = 4.65

Median = 4

Mode = 3

Range = 12

Upper quartile = 6

Lower quartile = 3

Inter quartile range = 3

Special Interest.

 As previously with the news articles I have decided to compare ‘special interest’ with ‘special interest.’ The two sections which I will be analysing are ‘Property Mail’ from the Daily Mirror and ‘Business’ from the Daily Telegraph. However the method in which I am going to collect my data is different to how I collected my data for the news.

 Firstly as in the news I will number all the paragraphs in the article, but this time I will choose many paragraphs. For example, I will put into my calculator 32Ran# my calculator gives me the random number of 1.221 which rounded down equals 1. I will then count the words in the paragraph tallying them off in accordance to their word length. However as soon as the paragraph finishes I will ask my calculator for another random paragraph number, than I shall carry out the same procedure until I have tallied off 100 words. Therefore the difference with the method of data collection I am using for ‘special interests’ is different from that I used for ‘news.’

Newspaper: The Daily Mail

Article: Property Mail

Date: Nov 7th 2003

Length of Word (letters)

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

1

2

2

2

15

17

3

27

44

4

11

55

5

10

65

6

11

76

7

14

90

8

4

94

9

3

97

10

1

98

11

2

100

12

0

100

13

0

100

14

0

100

...read more.

Conclusion

 The difference will lie in how I count my hundred words; I will start again by getting a random number from my calculator. From the paragraph number I will get I will count every nth word. In my case n will be 4 therefore I will count every 4th word, until I reach the 100 word mark. I am hoping that by using three different random methods of data collection the results that I will record will be un-bias and back up my hypothesis.

 Here are my results:

Newspaper: The Daily Mirror.

Article: 'Liverpool F.C.'

Date: 7th November 2003

Length of Word (letters)

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

1

10

10

2

12

22

3

16

38

4

13

51

5

15

66

6

12

78

7

7

85

8

6

91

9

3

94

10

2

96

11

4

100

12

0

100

13

0

100

14

0

100

Mean =

Median =

Mode =

Range =

Upper quartile =

Lower quartile =

Inter quartile range =

Newspaper: The Times

Article: ‘Liverpool FC’

Date: November 7th 2003

Length of Word (letters)

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

1

2

2

2

18

20

3

20

40

4

15

55

5

15

70

6

11

81

7

5

86

8

5

91

9

3

94

10

4

98

11

1

99

12

0

99

13

1

100

14

0

100

Mean =

Median =

Mode =

Range =

Upper quartile =

Lower quartile =

Inter quartile range =

 I will now go on to calculate measures of spread of all three samples combined, and compare both newspapers.

image02.png

Although here the mean seems to be very different when I turn the mean back into discrete data the values are not different.

image03.png

Median = Tabloids : 4

                 Broadsheets : 5

Mode = Tabloids : 3

              Broadsheets : 4

Range = Tabloids : 13

               Broadsheets : 13

...read more.

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