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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 6755

Consumer responses to wine bottle back labels

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Lockshin, Larry

Unwin, Tim

Source:        Journal of Wine Research; Dec99, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p183, 13p, 5

charts        

Document Type:        Article        

Subject Terms:        *CONSUMER behavior

*CONSUMERS -- Attitudes

*WINE industry

WINE labels

NAICS/Industry Codes

42282 Wine and Distilled Alcoholic Beverage Wholesalers

Abstract:        Abstract This paper reports on an exploratory study of

consumer responses to the information contained on wine bottle back labels. It was based on research conducted with respondents in Australia in early 1999. Its central findings were: (1) that experienced consumers have difficulty in matching the tastes of wines with their back label descriptions; (2) that 57% of the respondents claim regularly to read back labels in making their purchasing decisions; (3) that the information they found most useful in helping them to identify the wines was simple descriptions of the tastes or smells of the wines; and (4) that it is difficult to draw general conclusions about the effects of gender, age, income or occupation on such responses. [ABSTRACT FROM

AUTHOR]        

Full Text Word Count:        6158        

ISSN:        0957-1264        

Accession Number:        2791811        

Persistent link to this record:

http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,ui

d&db=buh&an=2791811        

Cut and Paste:        <A

href="http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,

url,uid&db=buh&an=2791811">Consumer Responses to Wine Bottle Back

Labels.</A>        

Database:         Business Source Premier        

CONSUMER RESPONSES TO WINE BOTTLE BACK LABELS

Abstract This paper reports on an exploratory study of consumer responses to the information contained on wine bottle back labels. It was based on research conducted with respondents in Australia in early 1999. Its central findings were: (1) that experienced consumers have difficulty in matching the tastes of wines with their back label descriptions; (2) that 57% of the respondents claim regularly to read back labels in making their purchasing decisions; (3)

...read more.

Middle

Second, the average weighted number of total mentions of a word was 24.09, with a range from 0 to 72.72. When this is disaggregated to consider the net weighting per word, the overall balance is just positive at 0.53 suggesting that respondents felt that the words were generally somewhat more helpful than they were unhelpful. The range, from - 41.4 to + 72.72, also reinforces this view that positive views outweighed the negative ones.

Third, individual participants highlighted a wide range of different numbers of words as being of significance to them. The mean number of words per bottle seen as being either helpful or unhelpful was thus 5.22, but the range varied from 0 per bottle to 14.83 per bottle.

Overall, the mean number of positive words (2.67) slightly outweighed that of negative words (mean 2.55), suggesting once again that participants were marginally more positive about the descriptors than they were negative. When these figures are disaggregated by gender, it would appear that women tended to mention slightly more words than men (mean number of words for women = 5.42, for men = 5.06), and likewise the range for women was higher, ranging from 0 to 14.83, as compared with the men's range of 0-9.83.

Any attempt to explore the significance of individual words is fraught with difficulty, in large part because such types of content analysis fragment the contexts within which words may be situated. Nevertheless, detailed examination of the emphasis placed on each word, as well as on clusters of words, provides some illuminating findings. In order to identify the words over which there was widespread agreement, it was decided to use a total weighted value of more than 31.84 (mean + 0.5 standard deviation) as an indication of high frequency of mention, and a net weighted value of > + 18.08 or < -17.45 (+ / - 1 standard deviation around the mean of 0.53)

...read more.

Conclusion

Combris, P., Lecocq S. & Visser, M. (1997) Estimation of a hedonic price

equation for Bordeaux wine: does quality matter?, The Economic Journal,

107, 390-402.

Crawford, C.M. (1985) A new positioning typology, Journal of Product

Innovation and Management, 4, 243-253.

Gawel, R. (1997) The use of language by trained and untrained

experienced wine tasters, Journal of Sensory Studies, 12(4), 267-284.

Kidd, I. (1999) The power of packaging, The Australian and New Zealand

Wine Industry Journal of Oenologv, Viticulture, Finance and Marketing,

14(1), 81-83.

Melcher, J.M. & Schooler, J.W. (1996) The misremembrance of wines past:

verbal and perceptual expertise differentially mediate verbal

overshadowing of taste memory, Memory and Language, 35(2), 231-245.

Rasmussen, M. & Lockshin, L. (1999) Wine choice behaviour: preliminary

research on the effects of regional branding, The Australian and New

Zealand Wine Industry Journal of Oenology, Viticulture, Finance and

Marketing (in press).

Shaw, M., Keeghan, P. and Hall, J. (1999) Consumers judge wine by its

label, study shows, The Australian and New Zealand Wine Industry Journal

of Oenology, Viticulture, Finance and Marketing, 14(1), 84-89.

Tucker, B. (1998) It's what's on the bottle that counts, The Australian

and New Zealand Wine Industry Journal, 13(3), 281-283.

Unwin, T. (1999) Hedonic price indexes and the qualities of wines,

Journal of Wine Research, 10(2), 95-104.

~~~~~~~~

By Steve Charters; Larry Lockshin and Tim Unwin

Steve Charters, School of Marketing, Tourism and Leisure, Edith Cowan

University, Joondalup, Western Australia 6027, Australia; Larry

Lockshin, School of Marketing, University of South Australia, GPO Box

2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia; Tim Unwin, Department of Geography,

Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK.

  _____  

Copyright of Journal of Wine Research is the property of Carfax

Publishing Company and its content may not be copied or e-mailed to

multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder`s

express written permission. However, users may print, download, or

e-mail articles for individual use.

Source: Journal of Wine Research, Dec99, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p183, 13p

Item: 2791811

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