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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 4793

Data handling coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Data handling coursework

Introduction

For our data handling coursework we decided to collect data on ourselves, as we would find it more interesting and relevant than it would be looking at other people’s data that we don’t know. We started by collecting data in our maths class on how long people could hold their breath for so that we could use it in our coursework. We found this a problem however, because some people in the class didn’t act sensibly and it was hard to record the results accurately. As this was a problem, every pupil was asked ‘multiple choice’ questions or questions that involved measuring part of themselves. Questions were asked about the following things:

  • Gender
  • Date of birth
  • Arm span
  • Elbow to wrist
  • Hand span
  • Head circumference
  • Height
  • Foot length
  • Favourite colour
  • Favourite sport

This data was collected by surveys that were sent out to each math class in the school so that every pupil could fill it in and give it to their teacher who recorded the data so we could use it for our coursework. We used these sorts of questions because it was easy to collect and nobody found it personal. We could have collected data on different variables like:

  • Weight
  • Chest size
  • Waist size
  • Hips
  • Inside leg measurement

However, we decided not to because some people would find it embarrassing and personal.

Hypothesis

My hypothesis is that boys will have bigger hand spans than girls.

I have noticed that generally boys are bigger than girls and I am interested to see if this applies to hand spans.

Plan: Sampling

I will collect a sample of 30 boys and 30 girls from each year group. I am choosing to collect

...read more.

Middle

18.62333333

19.11

18.5

Median

18.25

19

19

19.5

19

Mode

18

18 and 19

19

20

19

Range

30

7

14

6.4

6.5

These were the averages from my original data sample. I changed the outliers to give more accurate results and they are shown in the table below.

Male:

Average/range

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year11

Mean

18.35666667

19.44

20.43333333

21.86

20.62333333

Median

18.5

19.25

21

22

21

Mode

18 and 20

21

22

21 and 22

22

Range

9

6

12

7

8

Female:

Average/range

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year11

Mean

18.443333

18.68666667

18.62333333

19.11

18.5

Median

18

19

19

19.5

19

Mode

18

18 and 19

19

20

19

Range

10

7

14

6.4

6.5

The highlighted columns are the averages that have been changed. I changed the numbers 50.2 and 64 with the numbers 17.5 and 18.8 as they were the next numbers after the outliers. I changed these two numbers in the highlighted column (year 8) for the males. In the female table I changed the number 45 with26 for the highlighted column (year 7).

These tables show that my hypothesis is partly right because the averages are bigger for boys hand spans than they are for girls in each year group apart from year 7 which is by a very small amount.. These tables also show that the female’s data varies more in the first three years as the range is bigger, they then begin to become more grouped as you start to look at the two older years.

Pie charts

I rounded the decimal numbers up or down to the closest whole number and then drew them on the circle. 360º represents the whole of the data (100%) and if there was only one person who had a particular hand span measurement then the degree would be 12 because 360/30=12. To work out the degree I needed for each size I had to find out how many people had that measurement in the year I was doing, divide it by thirty because that is how big the sample is and then times by 360 and that would tell me the number of degrees needed to represent the number on the circle. For example if there were twelve people in year seven with a hand span measurement of 20, I would then work out the degree by doing this calculation:

12/30=0.4

0.4*360=144

I would then draw a line on the graph and then draw a line from that, that measures144º. After that I would then work out the next hand span measurement and draw the degree on the graph.

The degrees I worked out and drew on the pie charts are drawn in these tables:

Male year 7

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle (º)

13

1

12

15

1

12

16(including 15.5 and15.9)

3

36

17(including 16.7)

2

24

18(including 17.8)

7

84

19(including 2 at 18.5)

7

84

20(including 19.5)

7

84

22

2

24

Female year 7

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

15

2

24

16

2

24

17

4

48

18(including 2 at 17.8)

8

96

19(including 2 at 18.5and 19.1)

8

96

20(including 19.5)

1

12

21(including 20.5 and 20.8)

3

36

22

1

12

25

1

12

Male year 8

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

16

1

12

17

3

36

18(including 17.5)

2

24

19(including 18.5 and 18.8)

9

108

20(including 19.5and 20.4)

5

60

21(including 20.5)

9

108

22

1

12

Female year 8

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

14

1

12

15

1

12

18(including 4 at 17.5and 1at 18.1)

11

132

19(including 18.5)

7

84

20(including 19.5)

6

72

21(including 20.5)

4

48

Male year 9

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

12

1

12

16

1

12

17

1

12

18(including 17.5)

2

24

19(including 18.9 and 19.4)

2

24

20(including 19.5 and 20.4)

5

60

21(including 20.5,21.1 and 21.2)

6

72

22(including 3 at 21.5)

8

96

23

2

24

24

2

24

Female year 9

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

9

1

12

16

2

24

17(including16.5)

3

36

18(including 17.5)

3

36

19(including 2 at 18.5 and 1 at 19.1)

11

132

20(including 19.5,20.2 and 20.4)

5

60

21(including 20.5)

4

48

23

1

12

Male year 10

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

18

1

12

19(including 18.5)

2

24

20(including 19.5 and 19.9)

5

60

21

5

60

22(including 21.8)

6

72

23

2

24

24(including 23.8)

6

72

25(including 24.5 and 24.8)

3

36

Female year 10

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

15

1

12

17

2

24

18(including2 at 17.5)

3

36

19

8

96

20(including 19.5)

14

168

21

1

12

22

1

12

Male year 11

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

15

1

17

1

18(18.1)

1

19

3

20

6

21(including21.4)

6

22(including2 at 21.5)

10

23(including22.7)

2

Female year 11

Hand span measurement(cm)

Amount of people with that measurement

Degree drawn on circle(º)

15

4

48

16

1

12

17

2

24

18(including 17.5and 18.1)

5

60

19(including2 at 18.5)

8

96

20(including19.5)

6

72

21(including21.4)

3

36

22(21.50

1

12

...read more.

Conclusion

  • Year 9 males have a more spread out range.

This again shows that boys have bigger hand spans than girls at this age group, because they have higher quartiles and the only point lower is the lowest value which could have been a small outlier as it is about 3 or 4cm away from the next male up.

 The following results show the quartiles and median when read off the graph:

Males

Females

Lowest value

9

10

Highest value

24

24

Lower quartile

18.8

17.6

Median

20.5

19.2

Upper quartile

21.8

20.6

  • Year 10 males and females
  • All points on the graphs show that males have higher quartiles and medians than females.

This shows once again that boys in this age group generally have bigger hand spans than girls because all points that the graphs show are bigger for males. The lowest value, the highest value, the lower quartile, the median, the inter quartile range and the upper quartile are all bigger for males than they are for the females. The following results show the quartiles and median when read off the graph:

Males

Females

Lowest value

16

14

Highest value

26

22

Lower quartile

20.2

18.1

Median

21.7

18.6

Upper quartile

23

19.2

  • Year 11 males and females
  • All points on the graphs show that males have higher quartiles and medians than females.

This again shows that males have bigger hand spans than females at this age group. The following results show the quartiles and median when read off the graph:

Males

Females

Lowest value

14

14

Highest value

24

22

Lower quartile

19

16.6

Median

20.4

18.4

Upper quartile

21.2

19.4

These box plots back up my hypothesis because they show that males have bigger hand spans overall in the last 4 years the only age group that doesn’t back it up is year 7. This might be because girls are generally almost fully grown by year 7/8 which means that they don’t grow as much during the final years.

Conclusion:

From the graphs and averages that I have worked out I can clearly tell that boys generally do have bigger hand spans than girls which proves that my hypothesis is correct.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations section.

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