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Fencing Problem

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Introduction

John Smith        Thomas Alleynes High School        Maths Coursework

GCSE Maths Coursework-

The Fencing Problem

Introduction

I am going to investigate different a range of different sized shapes made out of exactly 1000 meters of fencing.  I am investigating these to see which one has the biggest area so a Farmer can fence her plot of land.  The farmer isn’t concerned about the shape of the plot, but it must have a perimeter of 1000 meters, however she wishes to fence off the plot of land in the shape with the maximum area.

Rectangles

I am going to look at different size rectangles to find which one has the biggest area.

Formula:Length x Width

Table Of results

Length

Width

Area

0

500

0

50

450

22500

100

400

40000

150

350

52500

200

300

60000

250

250

62500

300

200

60000

350

150

52500

400

100

40000

450

50

22500

500

0

0

Conclusion

I have found that the four sided shape that had the biggest area when using 1000 meters of fencing, was a square with the measurement of 250m x 250m and the area=62500

Isosceles Triangles

I am now going to look at different size Isosceles triangles to find which one has the biggest area.  I am going to use Pythagoras Theorem to find the height of the triangle.

Pythagoras Theorem:a²=b²+c²

Formula To Find A Triangles Area:½ x base x height

1. Base=100m        Sides=450m

Area: ½ x b x h

          ½ x 100 x 477

=23850m²

2. Base=200m        Sides=400m

Area: ½ x b x h

          ½ x 200 x 387

...read more.

Middle

Tan = opp

          adj

Tan 64.3 = h

             71.4275

2.08 x 71.4275 = h

              148.6 = h

½ x 142.855 x 148.6 = 10614.1

10614.1 x 7 = 74298.7

Area = 74298.7m²

Octagons

I am now going to look at an Octagon to find out its area when using 1000meters of fencing.

Formula To Find the Area Of A Octagon:

Exterior Angle = 360°

                    No. Of Sides

Interior Angle = 180°-Exterior Angle

I will then use tangent of an angle, to work out the area of one of the eight segments of the octagon.  I will multiply this number by 8 because the 8 segments are all the same size.  Therefore I will get the overall area of the octagon.

Octagon Area

Area: Ex. Angle = 360° = 45°

                             8

     Int. Angle = 180°-45°=135°

                    = 135°÷2=67.5°

Tan = opp

          adj

Tan 67.5 = h

                  62.5

2.41 x 62.5 = h

    150.625 = h

½ x 125 x 150.625 = 9414.0625

9414.0625 x 8 = 75312.5

Area = 75312.5m²

Nonagons

I am now going to look at a Nonagon to find out its area when using 1000meters of fencing.

Formula To Find the Area Of A Nonagon:

Exterior Angle = 360°

                       No. Of Sides

Interior Angle = 180°-Exterior Angle

I will then use tangent of an angle, to work out the area of one of the nine segments of the nonagon.  I will multiply this number by 9 because the 9 segments are all the same size.  Therefore I will get the overall area of the nonagon.

Nonagon Area

Area: Ex. Angle = 360° = 40°

                             9

     Int. Angle = 180°-40°=140°

                      = 140°÷2=70°

Tan = opp

          adj

Tan 70 = h

            55.55

2.75 x 55.55 = h

 152.8(1d.p) = h

½ x 111.1 x 152.8 = 8488.04

8488.04 x 9 = 76392.36

Area = 76392.36m²

Decagons

...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion

I was set the task of finding a shape with the biggest area when using 1000meters of fencing, so that a farmer could fence a plot of her land.  The shape didn’t matter, however it had to have the maximum area.

I investigated regular shapes because it is only when all the sides are equal I will get the highest area of that shape.

From investigating different shapes I overall found that a circle had the maximum area.  A circles area when using 1000meters of fencing is 79577.52m².

I noticed that the area didn’t change much when I started investigating the area of a Nine sided shapes and onwards.  Also when I reached a 40-sided shape the area change in a very small amount.  As you can see from my graph (on the previous page) the line goes up then curves round and becomes a constant line until we reach the area of a circle, where it stops as I found out because a circle has the maximum area.

In conclusion I have found that the more sides a shape has the bigger the area will be until you get to a circle, which as I found out has the maximum area.

...read more.

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