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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1257

I have been given the task of comparing the difference of word lengths in two articles.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

LIAM ROTHERY MATHMATICS STATISTICS COURSE WORK

image00.png

I have been given the task of comparing the difference of word length of two articles.

        I am going to do a word count of two articles and I am going to work out the reading age of the same two articles. As an extension, I am going to compare two articles on different subjects to see if the subject affects the word length and the reading age.

  • I am going to do a word count on two sports articles, one from a Broadsheet news paper (TELEGRAPH) and one from a magazine (MATCH). From this I hope to prove that the Broadsheet Newspaper uses longer words than the magazine.
  • I am also going to workout the reading age of the articles. From this I hope to prove that the reading age of the Broadsheet Newspaper is higher than that of the Magazine.
  • I shall also compare the sports article from the Broadsheet article from the Telegraph with a world issue or politics article from the same Newspaper. From this I hope to prove that the subject of the article affects the word lengths and reading age.  
...read more.

Middle

1

98

12

1

99

13

1

100

14

0

100

image01.png

Match magazine:

        Mean: 100 / 14 = 7.14,

        Median: 3.2,

        Mode: Three letters

Telegraph sports article:

        Mean:         100 / 14 = 7.14,

        Median: 4,

        Mode: Three letters

Telegraph politics article:

        Mean: 100 / 14 = 7.14

        Median: 3.4

        Mode: 3 / 4

Match magazine: Histogram 1

NO OF LETTERS

0.5-1.5

1.5-2.5

2.5-3.5

3.5-4.5

4.5-5.5

5.5-7.5

7.5-14.5

FREQUENCY

7

17

23

18

17

10

8

CLASSWIDTH

1

1

1

1

1

2

7

FREQUENCY

DENSITY

7

17

23

18

17

5

1.1

Telegraph sport article: Histogram 2

NO OF LETTERS

0.5-1.5

1.5-2.5

2.5-3.5

3.5-4.5

4.5-5.5

5.5-8.5

8.5-14.5

FREQUENCY

4

11

19

17

15

15

14

CLASSWIDTH

1

1

1

1

1

3

6

FREQUENCY

DENSITY

4

11

19

17

15

5

2.3

Telegraph politics article: Histogram 3

NO OF LETTERS

0.5-1.5

1.5-2.5

2.5-3.5

3.5-4.5

4.5- 6.5

6.5-10.5

10.5-14.5

FREQUENCY

4

18

20

20

19

16

3

CLASSWIDTH

1

1

1

1

2

4

4

FREQUENCY

DENSITY

4

18

20

20

9.5

4

0.75

Reading age.

Match magazine:

NO OF SENTENCES

7

NUMBER OF SENTENCES WITH 3 OR MORE SYLLABLES (Y)

12

X

0.07

X + Y

12.07

(X + Y) x 0.3 TO GIVE AMERICAN AVERAGE

4

READING AGE

9

Telegraph sports article:

NO OF SENTENCES

4

NUMBER OF SENTNCES WITH 3 OR MORE SYLLABLES (Y)

26

X

0.04

X + Y

26.04

(X + Y) x 0.3 TO GIVE AMERICAN AVERAGE

8

READING AGE

13

Telegraph politics article:

NO OF SENTENCES

4

NUMBER OF SENTENCES WITH 3 OR MORE SYLLABLES (Y)

27

X

0.04

X + Y

27.04

(X + Y) x 0.3 TO GIVE AMERICAN AVERAGE

8

READING AGE

13

...read more.

Conclusion

ss="c3">69

207

4

18

72

288

5

17

85

425

6

8

48

288

7

2

14

98

8

1

8

64

9

2

18

162

10

1

10

100

11

1

11

121

12

2

24

288

13

0

0

0

14

1

14

196

TOTAL

100

414

2312

Telegraph sports article:

X

F

FX

FX²

1

4

4

4

2

11

22

44

3

19

57

171

4

17

68

272

5

15

75

375

6

5

30

150

7

10

70

490

8

5

40

320

9

6

54

486

10

6

60

600

11

2

22

242

12

0

0

0

13

0

0

0

14

0

0

0

TOTAL

100

502

3154

Telegraph politics article:

X

F

FX

FX²

1

4

4

4

2

18

36

72

3

20

60

180

4

20

80

320

5

12

60

300

6

7

42

210

7

8

52

392

8

2

16

128

9

4

36

324

10

2

20

200

11

1

11

121

12

1

12

144

13

1

13

169

14

0

0

0

TOTAL

100

442

2564

Graphs 1, 2 and 3 show the cumulative frequency of each sample.

        Graph 1 shows that most the words in the Match magazine fell close together and were small words.

        Graph 2 shows the same about the sports article from the Telegraph.

        However, graph 3 shows that the politics article from the Telegraph had a bigger spread. The box plots show the same things only clearer.

        The histograms are there to show the frequency density. They also show were most the word are situated.

        The pie charts show the data as a percentage of the whole.

        The standard deviation is just another way of showing the spread of the data. All three articles have a standard deviation of around 2.7.

...read more.

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