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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1568

I have chosen to investigate the similarities and differences between broadsheet and tabloid newspapers, and whether their really is a difference in lexical choice and grammar between the two.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction I have chosen to investigate the similarities and differences between broadsheet and tabloid newspapers, and whether their really is a difference in lexical choice and grammar between the two. In our society today, there are various ranges of media which can influence and determine choices we make. One the most influential aspects is journalism. Newspapers are read all over the world by many different people who have very different lifestyles. Yet some papers can appeal to a whole range of people from many different professions. I intend to focus on the differences between these papers and the effect of social and ethical issues on them. From my research I hope to find that broadsheets use less emotive language and more descriptive, proving that supposedly more intelligent readers want more in-depth news and information. This will also show that tabloid papers make it easier for their readers by using simpler words and less complex sentences. Hypothesis "Readers of broadsheet newspapers are generally seen to be of a higher intelligence and socio-economic class than readers of tabloid papers." Methodology I have chosen to investigate the similarities and differences between broadsheet and tabloid newspapers, and whether their really is a difference in lexical choice and grammar between the two. ...read more.

Middle

Analysis There are many different areas I need to analyse before I can produce a final conclusion that either proves or disproves my hypothesis. I will look into the matter of lexical choice and also how structure can affect the way the text is presented. The lexical choice used in journalism is very unique depending on the paper (broadsheet or tabloid). This is because of the intended audience the editor is trying to write for. Firstly I will look into the lexical choice used within broadsheet newspapers and typically The Daily Telegraph. The lexical choice is quite unique and is specifically chosen to give readers a feeling that they are of a higher intellect. One example I am going to use is the article featured on page one of The Daily Telegraph, dated Monday January 6th. This article was written by Michael Smith and focused on the growing problem of 'Friendly Fire' in military combat and how it was evident throughout the Gulf War. Descriptive words were especially included in this article. These verbs were specifically added to this passage as it featured on the front page of the paper. ...read more.

Conclusion

This introductory passage is used on most pages and articles written. Usually the next paragraph is more complex and gives the readers vital information, which the leads off to relevant factions. This is a key difference between The Telegraph and the tabloid paper The Sun. The Daily Telegraph also uses lexical choice in many different ways to attract specific users. Examples of this are shown within an article on Rush Limbaugh, a right wing radio presenter from America, who is being portrayed as racist and ignorant. Usually an article like this from a tabloid paper would be full of emotive language, trying to persuade readers who have a strong opinion on the matter. But it is strange to see the way Toby Harnden composes his views and presents them. A comparison of the feature in The Telegraph with a feature in The Sun shows a distinct difference between structure and sentence length. Highly descriptive words along with lengthy paragraphs used in The Telegraph show how editors of The Sun compile their information differently. An example of this is from analysis of articles printed on Wednesday 6th February. The article is featured in both papers and is about a cup triumph for Leeds United. Both articles take up the majority of the main sports page, and both have short, but relevant titles. 2 Stewart Younger Blyth Community College ...read more.

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