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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1591

I was asked to investigate a hypothesis of my own choice based around the topic of newspapers for my statistical coursework. I am going to investigate two hypotheses where I will compare broadsheets and tabloids with each other.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction

I was asked to investigate a hypothesis of my own choice based around the topic of newspapers for my statistical coursework. I am going to investigate two hypotheses where I will compare broadsheets and tabloids with each other.

My hypotheses

Hypothesis 1

I think that older people will read more broadsheets and younger people will read more tabloids, or not read at all. I will also have the option of reading them both. To find out this data I am going to carry out a survey by asking a variety of people some questions based on this hypothesis. To set out the results from the information I have gathered I will display the data in a pie chart format.

Hypothesis 2

I think that broadsheets will have more words in each sentence than tabloids will. To find this information out I am going to look at stories that are the same in the tabloids and in the broadsheets. This will be the David Beckham story. I am also going to look at another two stories in a tabloid and another 2 in a broadsheet or how ever many stories it takes to get my total number of sentences up to 30. I am doing this so I can make sure that I get fair results.

...read more.

Middle

Broadsheets

Age

Number of people

14 - 19

1 x 72 = 72o

20 – 29

1 x 72 = 72o

30 – 39

0

40 – 49

0

50 – 59

1 x 72 = 72o

60 - 69

2 x 72 = 144o

360/5 = 72

This pie chart shoes me that the older generation i.e. 60-69 read more broadsheets than they do tabloids then the sections are rather equal for the other age groups but no one ages 30-39 and 40-49 read broadsheets which is also surprising because they are in the older half of the age group.image01.png

Both

Age

Number of people

14 - 19

4 x 24 = 96o

20 – 29

3 x 24 = 72o

30 – 39

4 x 24 = 96o

40 – 49

1 x 24 = 24 o

50 – 59

2 x 24 = 48o

60 - 69

1 x 24 = 24o

360/15 = 24

This is quite surprising because 14 – 19 and 40 –49 both have the same sized slice of the pie chart this shows me that they both read both papers while the others either read one or the other or neither. Everyone else has a small slice of the pie chart this shows me that the rest of the people I surveyed do not really read both papers.image02.png

Neither

Age

Number of people

14 - 19

6 x 30 = 180o

20 – 29

3 x 30 = 90o

30 – 39

1 x 30 = 30o

40 – 49

0

50 – 59

0

60 - 69

2 x 30 = 60o

360/12 = 30image03.png

On this pie chart it shows me that people aged 14 – 19 and 20 – 29 choose not to read any papers at all.

From doing this I have found out that more younger people choose to read either no papers at all or tabloids while older people choose to read both or broadsheets.

...read more.

Conclusion

News of the world

23 in 1st

16 in 2nd

37 in 3rd

21 in 4th

52 in 5th

40 in 6th

24 in 7th

21 in 8th

11 in 9th

17 in 10th

Sunday times

37 in 1st

28 in 2nd

27 in 3rd

60 in 4th

48 in 5th

18 in 6th

51 in 7th

35 in 8th

13 in 9th

20 in 10th

Now I will list all the number of words in a sentence then plot them in a stem and leaf diagram for the Sunday times.

62 in 1st

28 in 2nd

35 in 3rd

39 in 4th

24 in 5th

40 in 6th

29 in 7th

50 in 8th

59 in 9th

22 in 10th

25 in 1st

22 in 2nd

18 in 3rd

24 in 4th

15 in 5th

23 in 6th

22 in 7th

23 in 8th

18 in 9th

17 in 10th

37 in 1st

28 in 2nd

27 in 3rd

60 in 4th

48 in 5th

18 in 6th

51 in 7th

35 in 8th

13 in 9th

20 in 10th

I will now repeat what I have just done for the new of the world.

18 in 1st

21 in 2nd

18 in 3rd

28 in 4th

23 in 5th

45 in 6th

10 in 7th

11 in 8th

17 in 9th

18 in 10th

18 in 11th

22 in 12th

34 in 13th

16 in 14th

18 in 15th

23 in 16th

9 in 17th

11 in 18th

21 in 19th

37 in 20th

23 in 1st

16 in 2nd

37 in 3rd

21 in 4th

52 in 5th

40 in 6th

24 in 7th

21 in 8th

11 in 9th

17 in 10th

...read more.

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