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Investigate the effect of temperature on the bounce height of a squash ball.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jade McGreevy                                 Page

Squash Ball Investigation

Task

        I am trying to investigate the effect of temperature on the bounce height of a squash ball.

Plan

Equipment:

  • Metre rule - to make sure the drop height is 1m and to measure the bounce height
  • Squash ball – to be able to conduct the experiment
  • Beaker – to create the water bath
  • Water – to create the water bath
  • Tongs – to keep the ball below the water bath surface
  • Thermometer – to ensure the water is at the right temperature
  • Timer – to ensure the ball stays in the water bath for the right amount of time
  • Kettle – to get the water bath to the higher temperatures
  • Ice – to get the water bath to the lower temperatures

Method

        I am going to use the temperature range of 0°C to 70°C and I will go up in 10°C. I will only go up to 70°C because I know that after that temperature the rubber of the squash ball becomes damaged. I went down to 0°C because it is the lowest temperature we can be sure of reaching at school. This temperature also shows a low bounce height and if the temperature goes any lower it would be very difficult to read the bounce height. I will repeat each temperature 5 times to ensure accurate results and to be able to get a good average. Also I will be able to see any anomalies and not take them into account for my average. I will use a water bath in which I will put the squash ball. I will leave the squash ball in the water bath for 3 minutes as I know from my preliminary work that it takes 3 minutes for the squash ball to reach thermal equilibrium.

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Middle

0°C

70°C

Test 1

 (°C)

Test 2 (°C)

Average (°C)

Test 1 (°C)

Test 2

(°C)

Average

(°C)

0.50

3.0

3.0

 3.0

26.0

29.0

27.5

0.75

4.0

4.0

 4.0

42.0

44.0

 43.0

1.00

5.0

6.0

 5.5

59.0

60.0

 59.6

1.25

8.0

8.0

 8.0

74.0

74.0

 74.0

1.50

10.0

10.0

 10.0

80.0

80.0

 80.0

From this I can see that 1 metre is a suitable height that I can easily record all the heights down to the lowest temperature (0°C) and gives a good bounce height for 70°C so it satisfies both ends of the range of temperatures. This height gives a good range of results so they can be shown easily in a graph and compared. I decided not to use the higher heights because even though they would also give a good range of results and I would easily be able to see the height of the ball at a 0°C temperature, it was unsuitable for my experiment because it meant that I would have to keep getting up onto the table to be able to reach the heights. This would cause more of a safety hazard and wouldn’t be appropriate for the experiment when a metre will give just as good results and result range. Therefore from my preliminary work I am going to use a drop height of 1 metre and leave the squash ball in the water bath for 3 minutes for it to reach thermal equilibrium.

Test Results

Temperature (°C)

Test

1st (cm)

2nd (cm)

3rd (cm)

4th (cm)

5th (m)

Average (cm)

0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

5.0

10

8.0

9.0

8.0

8.0

9.0

8.4

20

21.0

20.0

21.0

21.0

21.0

20.8

30

29.0

28.0

29.0

28.0

29.0

28.6

40

37.0

38.0

38.0

38.0

38.0

37.8

50

46.0

46.0

45.0

45.0

45.0

45.4

60

51.0

52.0

51.0

51.0

52.0

51.4

70

59.0

58.0

58.0

58.0

59.0

58.4

From these results I have

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Conclusion

To provide additional relevant evidence I could:

  • Use temperatures that go up in 5°C instead of 10°C so I would have more information to show the relationship between the temperature of a squash ball and its bounce height.
  • I could have a better way of seeing the bounce height by having a video camera set up about a metre away from the experiment to see where about the ball bounced and then have another camera close up to see a closer reading of the bounce height. When I play back the video, I would put it on slow motion and show it frame by frame recording the heights until the bounce heights start to fall. Then I would take the maximum recording I had for that temperature and that would be the bounce height. This would be very accurate because I would see a very close up measurement and because it would be in slow motion and frame by frame it clearly showed the bounce height and could clearly be read from the bottom of the ball. This is more accurate than using your eyes because the ball would bounce very quickly and you only have a split second to read the height and is very difficult.

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