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Magazine articles have shorter words compared to newspaper articles

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Introduction

Magazine articles have shorter words compared to newspaper articles

This statement depends on where you get your data from and how you collect it. The ideal and best way would be to do a census of every newspaper and magazine article. As this is very hard you need you need to collect your data in as non-bias way as possible. To do this I chose my two articles from a newspaper and the newspapers magazine. The two articles were also based on the same subject. This will give me a clearer answer to the hypothesis. The result of the hypothesis is different from whichever you get your data from, the type of newspaper; tabloid or broadsheet, the type of magazine; its target audience and subject. I collected my data using systematic sampling. I counted every tenth word, for 100 hundred words.

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Middle

40

9

4

36

10

3

30

11+

0

0

Total

100

Calculating the mean: frequency x number of letters total

Frequency total

=      484

  1. = 4.84 letters/word

Calculating the mode: 4 letters/word

Calculating the median: 4letters/word

Calculating the range: UQ-LQ = IQR

                                      6  - 3   = 3        

Calculating the range: 10-1 = 9

Magazine

Newspaper

Mean

4.84

4.85

Median

4

4

Mode

2, 3

4

Range

10

9

Lower Quartile

3

3

Upper Quartile

6

6

Inter Quartile Range

3

3

Shown in Box and Whisker diagram

Analysis

From the box and whisker diagram it is clear my results are very similar. The middle 50% is identical, only the range is slightly varied. The mean is also very similar. These results support my hypothesis in which I said they should be the same. The average word is 4 letters long; we can get this information from the mean. This would be different if you collected a foreign language paper or magazine as the English language is made up of lots of little connecting words e.g. They, this, them, with.

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Conclusion

>

5

9

0.5

47

41 – 45

0

4

0

47

46 – 50

1

4

0.25

48

51 – 60

2

9

0.22

50

Histogram

Magazine

Words

Tally

Frequency

Frequency density

Cumulative frequency

  1 – 5

9

4

1

9

  6 –10

9

4

0.5

18

11 – 20

19

9

0.53

36

21 – 25

1

4

0.03

37

26 – 30

7

4

0.16

44

31 – 40

4

9

0.83

48

41 – 45

1

4

0.02

50

The results

Magazine

Newspaper

Mean

15.7

20.86

Median

13

19

Mode

4, 12

14

Range

37

54

Lower Quartile

6

12

Upper Quartile

22

26

Inter Quartile Range

16

14

I can also display this data in a cumulative frequency curve.

Analysis

Box and Whisker diagram

From the box and whisker diagram and the cumulative frequency graph I can tell that newspapers have longer sentences. My hypothesis was correct. The newspaper article had a much larger range; some sentences were very short while others very long. The magazine article had a smaller range and all the values were less. Magazine articles in general are longer than newspaper articles. Newspaper articles are read quickly and people take a shorter amount of time over them, they are generally shorter. To get a more accurate conclusion one would have to do a census of all newspapers and magazines, as this would be very hard you could do take more than one set of data.

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