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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1541

Maths number grid

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Number Grid Coursework

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20

9 x 20 = 180

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19 x 10 = 190

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40

            d = 10

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40

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    89 x 100 = 8900

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    99 x 90  = 8910

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              d  = 10  

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100

I have noticed that there is a difference of ten between the answers when multiplying the diagonally opposite corners of a 2 x 2 grid.  I have also noticed that the 2 x 2 grids I have used are the corners of the 100 square grid.  I will try using a 2 x 2 grid located more towards the centre of  the 100 square grid to see if it is  just the corner 2x2 grids that give a difference of 10.

34 x 45 = 1530

44 x 35 = 1540

         d  = 10

As you can see by my calculations it is not just a 2 x 2 grid in the corner that gives a difference of 10 when the diagonally opposite corners are multiplied. The position of the 2 x 2 grid on a 100 square grid does not change the difference.

I am now going to investigate if the difference is the same in a 2 x 3 grid when multiplying diagonally opposite corners.

2 x 3 grid

63

64

65

             63 x 75 = 4725

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74

75

             65 x 73 = 4745

                                                   d  = 20

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40

             38 x 50 = 1900

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50

             48 x 40 = 1920

                                                   d  = 20

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            11 x 23 = 253

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22

23

            21 x 13 = 273

                                                  d  =  20

...read more.

Middle

From my results, I have discovered that if you multiply diagonally opposite corners of a 2 x 4 box grid, taken from any position in a 100 square grid, the difference between the two answers will be 30.

2 high boxes

Height

Width

Difference

2

2

10

2

3

20

2

4

30

2

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40

As you can see in my table, I feel I could now use my findings to predict the difference for a 2 x 5 grid.  As I have already predicted, the difference will be 40.

2 x 5 grid

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              1 x 15 = 15

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             11 x 5  = 55

d  = 40

My prediction was correct in saying that the difference in a 2 x 5 grid would be 40.

I have noticed that it does not make any difference to the outcome wherever the grid is taken from in a 100 square grid.

From now on I only need to try one box of each size as I know that position has no effect on the difference.

2 x w Algebra (Any width)

n

 n+w

             n+w-1

n+10

n+10+w-1

             (n+10+w-1) = n+w+9

(n)  (n+w+9) = n2 + nw +9n

(n+10) (n+w-1) = n2 + nw – 1n +10n + 10w -10

(n2 +nw+9n) – (n2+nw+9n+10w-10) = d

10w-10= d

...read more.

Conclusion

n

n+w-1

g(h-1)+n

g(h-1)+n+(w-1)

gh-g+n                               gh-g+n+gw-1

n(gh-g+n+w-1)

=ngh-ng+(n2)+nw-n

(n+w-1)(gh-g+n)

=ngh-ng+(n2)+wgh-wg+wn-gh+g-n

d=(ngh-ng+(n2)+nw-n)-(ngh-ng+(n2)+wgh-wg+wn-gh+g-n)

d=wgh-wg-gh+g

I will now demonstrate how my formula works:

If g=10 h=4 w=3 n=5:

d= wgh-wg-gh+g

d=(3X10X4)-(3x10)-(10x4)+10

d=120-30-40+10

d=60

As you can see below, this is the answer I got for a 4x3 grid.

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       5 x 37 = 185

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       7 x 35 = 245

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               d = 60

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image00.png

By Philip Redpath

Algebra for h x w box on a 10x10 grid

n

n+w-1

10(h-1)+n

10(h-1)+n+(w-1)

10h-10+n                             10h-10+n+w-1

n(10h-10+n+w-1)

=10hn-10n+(n2)+wn-n

(n+w-1)(10h-10+n)

=10hn-10n+(n2)+10wh-10w+nw-10h+10-n

d=(10hn-10n+(n2)+wn-n)-( 10hn-10n+(n2)+10wh-10w+nw-10h+10-n)

d=10wh-10w-10h+10

I will now demonstrate how my formula works:

h=3     w=2     n=6

d=10wh-10w-10h+10

d=(10x2x3)-(10x2)-(10x3)+10

d=60-20-30+10

d=20

As you can see below, this is the same answer I got for a 3x2 grid:

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4

           3 x 24 = 72

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14

           23 x 4 = 92

23

24

                   d = 20

...read more.

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