• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19
  20. 20
    20
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 3544

Maths Stats coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Daniel Knevitt 10S        Statistics Coursework        Mr Andrews

Plan

I have stratified randomly students from a fictional school called Mayfield high and from my own (Framingham Earl High). All the sampled people are from year 10. I wanted to sample sixty students altogether but I had to do 61 because that is what my stratified sample came to.

I have sampled the number of hours of TV they watch per week and their key stage 2 SATs results. I emailed all the necessary people from my school and all the Mayfield high data was supplied to me.

I will be using these methods of comparing my data:

Mode – The most common or most popular data value it is sometimes called the modal value.

The mode is most useful when one value appears much more often than any other. If the data values are too varied, then the mode should not be used. It is the only average that can be used for qualitative (not numerical) data.

Median – To find the median of a set of data, put the values in order of size. The media is the middle value.

For larger sets of data the rule is n+1

2

For sets of data that has an even number of values i.e. 10 than the median value is the difference between the 5th and 6th value.

Mean

...read more.

Middle

9

7

LQ=9

Watkinson-Powell

Anna

9

8

Barry

Kayleigh

10

9

Collins

Louise

10

10

Bale

Jemma

11

11

Hughes

Donna

12

12

Ullah

Lisa

14

13

Black

Mia

14

14

Median=14

Rogers

Jade

14

15

Gorst

Francesca

15

16

Taylor

Jenifer

16

17

Gannon

Natalie

17

18

Allan

Charlotte

21

19

Butterworth

Jessica

24

20

Barker

Lucy

26

21

UQ=26

Knights

Melissa

27

22

Merrywest

Alice

27

23

Finney

Charlotte

29

24

Mutty

Tamsin

29

25

Wilson

Kelly

29

26

Lusher

Leanne

32

27

Range: 27

As you can see I have worked out again the median, lower quartile, upper quartile and the interquartile range again because it has obviously changed. I have used the information that I have been left to draw another box plot.

My new box plot doesn’t tell me a lot more than my last box plots did.

All it showed me that the men’s box plot was a bit more negatively skewed than it showed on the last box plots.

Conclusion

In this investigation I have found out:

  • Men on average watch an amount of TV per week 2.179(4sf) times the amount girls do.
  • It seams as though girls have other thing to do other than watch TV maybe they see TV as a last resort for boredom whilst boys it might be their first choice of entertainment.

Hypothesis 2

Girls total for their Key Stage 2 SATS results are generally higher than boys because they are much better at concentrating.

These are the two sets of data that I will be comparing:

Female

Surname

Forename

Total KS2 SATS Results

Collins

Louise

9

1

Armstrong

Sarah

10

2

Barker

Lucy

10

3

Finney

Charlotte

10

4

Gorst

Francesca

10

5

image04.png

Ullah

Lisa

10

6

Gannon

Natalie

11

7

LQ-11

Kelson

Nina

11

8

Merrywest

Alice

11

9

Barry

Kayleigh

12

10

Black

Mia

12

11

Durst

Freda

12

12

Owen

Gemma

12

13

Rogers

Jade

12

14

Wilson

Alice

12

15

Median-12

Wilson

Kelly

12

16

Bale

Jemma

13

17

Brown

Emily

13

18

Knights

Melissa

13

19

Butterworth

Jessica

14

20

Fox

Serena

14

21

Hughes

Donna

14

22

UQ-14

Johnson

Leigha

14

23

Lusher

Leanne

14

24

Mutty

Tamsin

14

25

Taylor-Wall

Angela

14

26

Allan

Charlotte

15

27

White

Helen

15

28

Watkinson-Powell

Anna

16

29

Range: 6

Male

Surname

Forename

...read more.

Conclusion

To work out the line of best fit:

The equation is; y=mx+c

Remember, ‘m’ is the gradient of the line. ‘c’ is the point where the line cuts the vertical axis. ‘y’ and ’x’ are the names of the axis.

To find out the gradient, Gradient = vertical difference

                                                  horizontal change

So the equation of my line of best fit is;

y=mx+c

Gradient = vertical difference              =       2 _m= 0.0384615

              horizontal change                         52

y=0.0384615x+13

Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation

For this I will need 10 different people to compare, I have chosen the extreme lower and the extreme upper person alphabetically and the lower and upper quartile person alphabetically and the median person. The people I have chosen are highlighted in pink.

Total KS2 SATS Results

15

13

14

13

12

Average number of hours TV watched per week

32

13

12

34

29

Rank

Total KS2 SATS Results

5

2.5

4

2.5

1

Average number of hours TV watched per week

4

2

1

5

3

d

1

0.5

3

2.5

-2

d2

1

0.25

9

6.25

4

20.5

Conclusion

I conclude for this hypothesis that watching more TV does affect your total for your KS2 SATS results but only on a very small scale. There are many other factors that can affect your KS2 SATS results. Here are some of those factors:

  • What you watch on TV because some programs are educational and are specifically for helping you with your tests.
  • Your natural IQ can affect your results because some people are naturally bright and they think in different ways.
  • Your upbringing can affect your results because some parents do not believe in SATS tests and they do not encourage their son/daughter to do well in them.

                Page  of

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations essays

  1. mayfield high statistics coursework

    James The Simpsons 21 122 10 Edd Michael 0 81 11 Fillstin Rowena Holly Oaks 14 104 10 Jones Nathan Bad Girls 8 92 11 Zarrent Donna Buffy 36 103 11 Thompson Kamara Big Brother 6 89 11 Thomson Jade Brookside 18 96 11 Solomons Ian The Simpsons 16 100

  2. Edexcel GCSE Statistics Coursework

    Female 1.65 0.09 2.7225 Female 54 6.1 37.21 Female 1.65 1.65 2.7225 Female 50 2.1 4.41 Female 1.68 1.68 2.8224 Female 42 -5.9 34.81 Female 1.71 1.71 2.9241 Female 60 12.1 146.41 Female 1.72 1.72 2.9584 Female 56 8.1 65.61 Female 1.75 1.75 3.0625 Total 1437 0 1158.7 Total 46.82 7.82 73.6234 SD= 211.5 SD= 13.4 Gender Height (x)

  1. Statistics coursework Edexcell

    year eight cumulative figures are steeper than the year seven cumulative figures That year eight boys will be smaller than year

  2. GCSE maths statistics coursework

    I will use the same samples I used for the histograms. The frequency polygons will help me compare the two visually. I predict that the girls will weigh more than the boys but the boy's weight will be more spread out than the girls.

  1. Statistics Coursework

    Weights * As you can see from the diagrams, the lowest weight of the males (39kg) is higher than that of the females (37kg). This supports my second sub-hypothesis, as I believed that trends such as this would be observed.

  2. Mayfield Coursework

    w < 145 1 2 145 ? w < 150 0 2 150 ? w < 155 3 5 155 ? w < 160 2 7 160 ? w < 165 1 8 165 ? w < 170 4 12 170 ? w < 175 2 14 175 ?

  1. Mayfield Maths Coursework

    I will also use the 'correl' function in Microsoft Excel to see how well the two sets of data are linked. The coefficient of correlation that is calculated should give me a value close to 1 (which would show a perfect positive correlation).

  2. maths statistics coursework

    1.62 50 10 M 1.8 63 10 M 1.65 68 10 M 1.77 59 Year Gender Height Weight 11 M 1.72 63 11 M 1.85 73 11 M 1.62 52 11 M 1.62 56 11 M 1.55 54 11 M 1.51 40 11 M 1.58 54 11 M 1.73 60

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work