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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 2294

Mayfield High School- Statistics and
 Data Handling Coursework


Extracts from this document...

Introduction

image00.png

Rosanna Marr

For this project I have decided to look at the correlation between the height and weight of pupils at Mayfield High. We were given data about an imaginary high school which showed pupils’ gender, date of birth, IQ, eye colour along with other information. On deciding what I was going to investigate it became clear that much of this information was unnecessary, so, on my database, provided from my school computer, shown on Excel, I deleted certain categories, but kept information on height, weight, surname, forename, gender, year group and age, which I felt might come in handy during my enquiry.  

To collect the data I needed, I simply transferred it from the provided statistics on Excel, to other worksheets, splitting the information into several different categories. My first category was a mixed sample, including both genders and all of the years. I used an equation;

=INT(RAND()*(1183-1)+1)

I used this in order to generate random whole numbers between 1 and 1183, giving me a completely unsystematic mix of pupils from Mayfield High. This means that during this section of work, I will

...read more.

Middle

Parreen

Saika

12

Female

1.60

45

979

8

Patel

Stephanie

13

Female

1.65

49

982

8

Royale

Danniel

13

Male

1.25

61

1021

9

Saleem

Adila

14

Female

1.64

70

1027

9

Saleem

Adila

14

Female

1.64

70

1027

7

Sayers

Ben

11

Male

1.54

40

1035

9

Singh

Karam

14

Female

1.49

40

1058

9

Slone

Mark

14

Male

1.58

50

1064

7

Smith

Karan

12

Female

1.42

29

1070

7

Thompson

Maddie

12

Female

1.73

49

1112

7

Tnguine

Tina

12

Female

1.63

50

1121

7

White

Catherine

12

Female

1.56

45

1155

7

Whitworth

Kayleigh

12

Female

1.52

40

1160

10

Banks

Robbin

15

Male

1.66

66

Before I explain how I went about using this sample to try to discover correlation between my two chosen factors, I think it

necessary to state what outcome I think I will find after putting this information into graph-form and analysing it. I think I will definitely find a certain amount of correlation, but that the relationship will not be very strong. I think I will have to carry on looking into this in more depths in order to find a distinct relationship between pupils’ height and weight.

Firstly I decided to make some tally charts to analyse the data about the weights of the pupils, I then put this into a bar chart for easier viewing.

image01.png

283

11

Ratty

Louise

15

Female

1.65

45

291

7

Afsal

Oliver

11

Male

1.55

45

378

9

Banks

Robin

14

Male

1.73

45

426

7

Bates

Holly

12

Female

1.61

45

436

9

Bowy

Jake

14

Male

1.54

45

472

9

Burn

Suzanne

14

Female

1.6

46

498

7

Clarke

Claire

12

Female

1.59

46

548

7

Craft

Clara

12

Female

1.58

47

566

7

Davies

Jamie

12

Male

1.57

47

588

7

Dickinson

Ben

12

Male

1.49

48

603

8

Drayton

Benjamin

13

Male

1.55

48

618

9

Dwyer

Tommas

14

Male

1.58

49

622

7

Fisher

Emma

12

Female

1.31

49

This chart shows that the modal weight is between 45-49, and from looking at my random mixed sample data, is it clear to see that from this range of numbers, 45kg is the most common.

I also worked out, that the mean weight of the pupil’s in this sample rounds down to 51kg. I worked this out by adding up all the weights then dividing the total by 50, the number of pupils. Also I found, by sorting the weights into ascending order, and finding the 25th weight, that the median is 49kg.

Using tally charts I also decided I would work out the mean, mode and median of the heights of the pupils using the same strategies. These turned out to be:

mean=1.5892 m

modes were 1.55m and 1.58m with 4 each. (1.6m to 2significant figures or 156.5 as the number inbetween)

median =1.58m

I also changed the tally chart into a bar chart, using grouped frequencies.

image02.png

……ranges?

Also using this sample I also decided to plot a scatter graph, to see if there was an overall correlation between height and weight. Firstly, I used Data Sort on Excel to arrange my information starting with the lowest height, and working up to the highest, so that when I plotted my graph, it would be in the correct order to see if there was any correlation.

Here is my scatter graph;

image03.jpg

The circled crosses represent data, which occurred twice, for example:

1155

7

Whitworth

Kayleigh

12

Female

1.52

40

1160

10

Banks

Robbin

15

Male

1.66

66

From this scatter graph it seems that there is quite poor correlation, but definitely some, as roughly the crosses do go from left to right, bottom to top. However,

it seems that this random mixed sample is not the best way to work out the relationship between the height and weight of the pupils in Mayfield High.

To try and see why this did not work out the amount of male/female pupils, and the number of pupils from each year within my sample to check its correspondence with the data on a whole.

Total in my random sample

Total in school

Boys

20

604

Girls

30

579

Year 7’s

18

282

Year 8’s

4

270

Year 9’s

14

261

Year 10’s

9

200

Year 11’s

5

170

Total

50

1183

...read more.

Conclusion

Year Group

Surname

Forename 1

Years

Months

Gender

Height (m)

Weight (kg)

1

10

Abejurouge

Henry

15

3

Female

1.63

60

2

10

Aberdeen

Richard

15

0

Female

1.75

45

If I hadn’t of checked that this separation worked, I would have ended up using data such as this, which is really supposed to belong to my male sample. Therefore, I simply had to go through it all the long way, to make sure my data was correct.

I have decided to analyse this data like I did before, in order to see whether, like I assumed in my hypothesis, there is stronger correlation now between height and weight because I have made this gender split. In order to do this I will hopefully work out the mean, median, mode and ranges of this data and plot some graphs, to try and find out the relationship between height and weight.

MEAN, MEDIAN AND MODE.

Height

weight

mean

(total)46.21/30=1.54m

(total)1495/30=49.8kg

median

1.63m

49.5 kg

mode

1.62 and 1.68m

45 kg

After analysing the female data I plan to do the same for the male, so I can see if there is much similarity between the two. I am hoping that there will be noticeable difference between the two genders, in order for there to show some sign of a difference when I plot some graphs based on my male/ female samples to see if separating the two causes more correlation to become apparent.  

...read more.

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