• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

My physics coursework is an experiment with gravity. The experiment is done by creating a parachute with a plastic bag.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Physics coursework.

My physics coursework is an experiment with gravity. The experiment is done by creating a parachute with a plastic bag. The parachute has a given area and is usually square shaped. This means that the area is easily calculated. There are lengths of string attached to the chute which hold a ball of play dough at the bottom.

image00.png

To do the experiment we have a choice of either keeping the mass of the play dough the same and keep changing the area of the chute, or we could keep the area of the chute the same and change the mass of the play dough each time. I have decided to keep changing the mass of the putty.

AIM: To find out if the weight of the putty has any affect on the speed at which the parachute falls.

PREDICTION: I think that the greater the mass of the putty, the faster the parachute falls.

...read more.

Middle

Time taken to fall

5 g

4 g

3 g

2 g

1 g

SAFETY FEATURES: There are only two hazards within this experiment, one of them is when you are using scissors to cut out the parachute, the other one is when your standing on a table to get enough height to drop the parachute from.

CONTROLNG VARIABLES: To make the experiment fair I need to control certain things. One of the is the height at which each parachute is dropped. If I drop them from different heights then I will get invalid results as the heavier one may be dropped from a different height to the lighter one. Another variable I need to control is the area of the parachute. If I do not keep the area of the parachute the same the results will not be right as a bigger chute will create more air resistance and fall slower.

RESULTS: The recordings in the following table are the results from the experiment.

Weight of putty

Time taken to fall

5 g

1.26 seconds

4 g

1.27 seconds

3 g

1.35 seconds

2 g

1.40 seconds

...read more.

Conclusion

image02.png

The graph below shows the results for the second experiment.

image03.png

This is the graph from the second experiment.

EVALUATION: The two tables and their graphs clearly show that my prediction was right. That the heavier the putty on the parachute, the faster the parachute falls. Although the second set of results have a greater range between the slowest and the fastest falling chutes then the first set of results, they both fully correspond with each other in as much as that they both show the same pattern. Both sets of results show that the greater the weight of the putty, the faster the chute falls.

CONCLUSION: The theory in my prediction must be right. I said in my prediction that the greater the size of the putty, the grater the effect gravity has on it because gravity has a bigger surface area to act upon. The tests I carried out have proven me right. They all show that the heavier putties (which are bigger in physical size) fall faster because gravity has more mass to work on.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Height and Weight of Pupils and other Mayfield High School investigations essays

  1. GCSE Physics Coursework

    In the graph above is shows the perpendicular distance from the pivot increases so does the amount of deflection because my graph has a positive correlation. These results occurred because moments bends the ruler not the weight of the load as it was kept the same.

  2. Investigating the falling of paper cake cases.

    As the height increases, so does the speed. This is true because there is more gravity and air resistance acting on the paper case. My preliminary results show obvious anomalies; this is why it is good to do a second lot of results.

  1. Statistics Coursework

    * The five aforementioned figures in the analysis of the heights also show similar patterns in the data for the weights - with the male data proving larger for each of the figures. This data supports my second sub-hypothesis, as it shows that on average males weigh more than females.

  2. Mayfield Coursework

    w < 175 2 14 175 ? w < 180 0 14 180 ? w < 185 1 15 Height (cm) Frequency Cumulative Frequency 120 ? w < 125 0 0 125 ? w < 130 1 1 130 ? w < 135 0 1 135 ?

  1. Mayfield Maths Coursework

    92 8 Male 3 3 4 3.333333333 92 9 Male 4 3 3 3.333333333 92 9 Male 3 3 4 3.333333333 92 9 Male 4 3 3 3.333333333 92 7 Male 3 3 4 3.333333333 97 11 Male 4 3 3 3.333333333 98 11 Female 3 4 4 3.666666667 91

  2. maths statistics coursework

    For my first task, I have decided to use samples from year 7, 9 and 11 pupils, this will then allow me to compare my results and agree or disagree with my hypothesis 3. Many would suggest sampling the data from all the years, however that will not only add

  1. Statistics Coursework

    This will give me a reliable sized sample, as it is impractical to incorporate all the data into the investigation. To choose which students to use in the investigation, I will calculate the number of students that need to be used from each year, and from each gender (i.e.

  2. Maths Stats coursework

    Gradient = vertical difference horizontal change Outliers - I will be removing these after I have drawn my box plots prevent myself from having any too extreme values which are mistakes and of which can give not a very accurate mean or Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work