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Introduction

Plan: My Statistics coursework!

Introduction

In my coursework I am trying to prove and disprove my hypotheses that I have mentioned below. I am using two newspapers, which are “The Metro” and “The Daily Mail.”

Students, who use the train or the bus, in the morning, to get to university or school, mainly read the metro. Also, men and women who use the same transport to get to work would also read the paper. These are the papers target audience. So therefore, to the benefit of the students the newspaper would use smaller words or not too complicated long words. Typically, the paper would have smaller words and fewer words in a sentence. We also expect there to be bigger pictures with less text than the Daily Mail.

Older people, educated people and conservative minded tend to read “The Daily Mail.” These are typically the target audience of the newspaper. So everyone would expect that the newspaper would use long complicated words and typically the paper would have longer words and more words in sentences. We also expect there to be more information and less picture (and smaller).

Hypotheses

1. “The Daily Mail” has longer words than “The Metro”

2. “The Metro” has fewer words in a sentence than in “The Daily Mail”

3. “The Metro” has bigger pictures (area) than in “The Daily Mail”

Planning of hypothesis 1  

“The Daily Mail” has longer words than “The Metro”

I will sample 1000 words in total from each newspaper.

I have chosen 1000 words because I would want to choose a number of words, which I could draw a decent conclusion with. I don’t want to only take a sample of 20 words as it would not prove or disprove the hypothesis in any way, as it would not be an overall conclusion.

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Middle

. In order to achieve the total number of words from each newspaper I will have to collect 1000 words. I could’ve collected all 1000 words in one day but it wouldn’t represent the newspaper fairly. This is because, if on a day, the newspaper is using very long words and they usually use fairly small words then the results I have collected were biased. It wouldn’t be accurate, as it hasn’t treated the newspaper fairly. By fair I mean, the collected data was false and inaccurate so a variety of days needs to be chosen. Also, the newspaper might have chosen to use fairly small words on a day which could cause problems. To solve this problem, I will do this over Monday to Friday so any anomalous results don’t get noticed that much and the results would still be reliable. By reliable, I mean the data could be trusted.

Planning of hypothesis 2  

“The Metro” has fewer words in a sentence than in “The Daily Mail”

I will sample 400 sentences in total from each newspaper.

I have chosen 400 sentences because I would want to choose a number of sentences, which I could draw a decent conclusion with. I don’t wan to only take a sample of 40 sentences, as they could be misleading. By accident, I could choose 40 long sentences or 40 short sentences. If that happened then the investigation would be pointless. This would most probably be just an overall summary of the page rather than the whole newspaper. I would want a decent number of sentences to investigate which I could use to figure out a decent conclusion to prove of disprove the hypothesis.

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Conclusion

3.  This would go into a category like 30cm3<picture size<40cm3.

I will do this over Monday to Friday so the total pictures are 100 pictures.

In order to achieve the total number of pictures from each newspaper I will have to collect 100 pictures and this would have to represent the newspaper on any day. I could’ve collected all the results on one day but this wouldn’t represent the newspaper fairly. This is because, if on a day, the newspaper is using very big pictures like they did on September 12th a few years ago when the twin towers fell down. But the newspaper usually uses very small pictures then the results I have collected are biased. It wouldn’t be accurate, as it hasn’t treated the newspaper fairly. By fair I mean, the collected data was false and inaccurate so a variety of days needs to be chosen. Also, the newspaper might have chosen to use fairly small pictures on a day, on which or the day before nothing exciting didn’t happen. To solve this problem, I will do this over Monday to Friday so any anomalous results don’t get noticed that much and the results would still be reliable. By reliable, I mean the data could be trusted.

...read more.

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