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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 3488

Statistics - compare three different newspapers.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Mathematics Coursework - Statistics My objective is to compare three different newspapers by using the following information: > The readability in terms of standard of language evidenced in different newspapers. > The amount of space devoted to various sections such as Sport, news and business. > The number of pages, size and the cost of each of the three newspapers. > Another thing that I will look at is the average newspaper in terms of size and cost. The three newspapers that I will compare are: - > The Sunday Times, which is a Broadsheet newspaper sold right throughout the UK containing news from right across the UK. It is mostly read by a person with a high standard of language such as a businessman. People may also wish to read the advertisements for housing, recruitment and classified advertisements. There are pages in this newspaper. > The Western Mail, which is a Tabloid newspaper, containing national news. This is one of the most popular tabloid newspapers currently being sold. It contains news on a variety of current events with a focus on features and leisure. It is considered an interesting paper for the reader. There are 90 pages in this newspaper. > The Telegraph is a Broadsheet newspaper with news from all over the world. It is known for its well-written articles and opinions and its readership tends to be members of the professional and business classes. There are 100 pages in this newspaper. My Hypothesis I think that: > The Sunday Times will have a large amount of business, but I don't think that it will have as much as the Times. > The Western Mail will be the newspaper that has percentages closest to the average, in terms of space devoted to different items, as it is a middle classed newspaper. > The Telegraph will have more business, as the reader is usually of a higher class such as a business man for example. ...read more.

Middle

One of these other methods is to use a table, it will give me the same answers but in much less time. The Sunday Times: Letters (L) Frequency (F) L� F?L F?L� 1 25 1 25 25 2 155 4 310 620 3 175 9 525 1575 4 120 16 480 1920 5 155 25 775 3875 6 95 36 570 3420 7 83 49 581 4067 8 79 64 632 5056 9 44 81 396 3564 10 36 100 360 3600 11 12 121 132 1452 12 2 144 24 288 Totals 981 650 4810 29462 The Sunday Telegraph: L F L� F?L F?L� 1 24 1 24 24 2 193 4 386 772 3 215 9 645 1935 4 231 16 924 3696 5 182 25 925 4550 6 133 36 798 4788 7 175 49 1225 8575 8 105 64 840 6272 9 70 81 630 5670 10 49 100 490 4900 11 14 121 154 4694 12 8 144 96 1152 Totals 1399 650 7137 47028 The Sunday Mirror: L F L� F?L F?L� 1 18 1 18 18 2 126 4 252 504 3 154 9 462 1386 4 116 16 464 1856 5 91 25 455 2275 6 74 36 444 2664 7 68 49 476 3332 8 61 64 488 3904 9 54 81 45 4374 10 23 100 230 2300 11 8 121 88 968 12 3 144 36 432 Totals 796 650 3458 24013 The next thing that I will do is see how many words there are per sentence, this will allow me to analyse the readability of the newspaper, my prediction is that the longer the sentence, the higher the standard of language will be. The Sunday Times: Words per Sentence Frequency Cumulative Frequency Total number of words 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 1 2 1 3 5 12 7 8 1 0 4 4 7 0 9 10 1 ...read more.

Conclusion

So the method I chose was not entirely accurate. The only way I think I could have analysed the articles more accurately is if I had taken a sample of words form the articles, and conducted a survey to see whether people found the words easy or difficult to understand. There is the same problem with analysing words per sentence, but I don't know of any other way I could have tackled this part of the investigation. Using standard deviation to measure the spread of the word length, I think was the best way of tackling that part of the investigation, as it took into consideration all of the data I had collected, and it made it easier for me to analyse the language levels. I had worked out that a large measure of spread would show a higher language level, and that a small measure of spread would show that the word length is not varied that much, but it may mean that either the words were all mostly short, mostly long, or somewhere in-between. By working out the standard deviation I was able to work out the following information: * The Observer had the smallest measure of spread and the lowest mean for letters per word, which shows us that it has the lowest language level out of all of the newspapers, this corresponds with the hypothesis I made about measure of spread for the Observer. * The Daily Mail has the highest mean and the largest measure of spread for letters per word, showing that it has the highest language level out of all the newspapers which proves the hypothesis I made, about the Times having the highest language level in terms of word length, wrong. * The Times' standard deviation values are in-between those of the Observer and The Daily Mail. which proves the hypothesis i made wrong. The hypotheses i made for this part of the investigation were on the right track, only my hypotheses for the Daily Mail and The Times turned out to be the opposite way round to how i had expected. ...read more.

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