• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1707

Tabloid and broadsheet newspapers - For this coursework I am going to find how many words there are in an article.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Tabloid and broadsheet newspapers

Method

For this coursework I am going to find how many words there are in an article. I will also find the average word length. I am going to pick two articles from random from a tabloid paper. I am then going to find the same two articles in a broadsheet newspaper. I am going to record the information in a frequency table (tally). From this I can then compare the results and find the mean, median, mode and range. I am then going to record the results in a bar and pie chart; this will show the information more clearly.

Plan

  • Write out a method
  • Chose two broad sheet and tabloid newspapers
  • Chose two articles that can be found in both papers
  • Make frequency graphs to show the result
  • Plot all the answers in a tally
  • Add up the frequency
  • Find the mode, median, mean and range
  • Plot the frequency in a bar and pie chart
  • I will use a line graph to compare the results.
  • Write up an evaluation

Prediction

...read more.

Middle

10+

1111 1111 1

11

Total

504

Article 2

Broadsheet

Tally

Frequency

1

1111 1111 1111

14

2

1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 11

37

3

1111 1111 1111 1111  1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111

50

4

1111 1111 1111 1111  1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111

64

5

1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 111

38

6

1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1

26

7

1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 11

27

8

1111 1111 1111 1111

20

9

1111 1111 11

12

10+

1111 1111 111

13

Total

301

Newspaper

Frequency

Article 1Evening post

892

Article 1Broadsheet

479

Article 2 Evening post

504

Article 2 Broadsheet

301

Mean, Median, Mode and Range

Article 1 Tabloid

Frequency

Mean

1

50

50

2

169

338

3

183

549

4

154

616

5

108

540

6

58

348

7

57

399

8

48

384

9

37

333

10+

28

280

Total

892

3837

Mean

3837 / 892 = 4.30157

= 4.30

Median

28, 37, 48, 50, 57, 58, 108, 154, 169, 183

57 + 58 = 115

115 / 2 = 57.5

= 57.5

Mode

= 3

Range

183 – 28 = 155

= 155

...read more.

Conclusion

Another way I would improve on the coursework is by doing more articles. I say four articles doesn’t seem to give a fair result as it’s not that many, I think about 8 articles would give a much fair result. I would also use a wider range of newspapers to see if they would give me different results to what I have found. I used “Reading Evening Post” (Tabloid) and “Telegraph” (Broadsheet). I could have used:

  • The Sun (tabloid)
  • News of the World (tabloid)
  • The Star (tabloid)
  • Central (tabloid)

I have found out in this coursework that my perdition for word length was right. But I did get my perdition wrong on how many words there are in an article. I predicted that a broadsheet would have more words in it, as it is a bigger sized paper. I was very surprised when I found out that tabloid newspapers have much more words in than a broadsheet paper. I found that a tabloid newspaper had 26% to 30% more words in than a broadsheet.  

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparing length of words in newspapers section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparing length of words in newspapers essays

  1. Are participants more likely to recall a list of words, when words are accompanied ...

    The histogram drawn shows that the majority of those who could remember more words had been shown pictures with the words. These results support the alternative, one-tailed hypothesis, therefore the null hypothesis is rejected. The Mann Whitney U test showed that the data was significant at the 0.05 level, thus

  2. Assesment of Reading Difficulties in Patient AM Following the Development of Vascular Dementia.

    times slower than the average control time of (?). DISCUSSION These results demonstrate that AM's attentional deficit is not significant enough to impair his ability to locate, attend to and pick the target word from an array of words as he scores a maximum 24/24 on this task.

  1. Comparison between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers.

    II PAGE 43 (RANDOMLY SELECTED) FREQUENCY TABLE FOR BROADSHEET (WORDS) NO. OF LETTERS IN A WORD NO. OF WORDS 1 1 0 1 0 TOTAL= 2 2 5 6 6 7 TOTAL= 24 3 4 4 4 5 TOTAL= 17 4 3 3 5 4 TOTAL= 15 5 2 4

  2. "Broadsheet newspapers have a longer average word length than tabloid newspapers"

    15 + 4 + 3 + 4 + 4 = 940 200 = 4.7 Tabloid Sports (1x5)+(2x25)+(3x47)+(4x44)+(5x22)+(6x16)+(7x12)+(8x12)+(9x8)+(10x4)+(11x4)+(13x1) 5 + 25 + 47 + 44 + 22 + 16 + 12 + 12 + 8 + 4 + 4 + 1 927 200 = 4.635 Tabloid Financial (1x5)+(2x29)+(3x41)+(4x40)+(5x23)+(6x17)+(7x17)+(8x8)+(9x12)+(10x3)+(11x1)+(12x1)+(13x2)+(16x1)+(18x1)

  1. GCSE Statistics Coursework

    I will now do the same for the Daily Mail: Lower Quartile = 38 [Total amount of Numbers (n)] + 1 / 4 = 9.75th number. (I will round this up to 10.) No. of letters Frequency Cumulative Frequency 1 0 0 2 4 4 3 6 10 The 9.75th (10th)

  2. Compare the length of words in tabloid and broadsheet newspapers.

    rand ?strong> are Greek letters and (mathematically) mean 'standard deviation' and the 'sum of', respectively. The above formula means that we take the sum of the frequency multiplied by letters minus mean squared column [fx(x-x)?], and divide it by the number of words sampled (50).

  1. Statistics Coursework

    sampling because it makes my investigation equal, fair, and it won't make it biased. For my Secondary Data, I have chosen to do systematic sampling for my data collection because it is a simple and quick method. Systematic sampling is a regular pattern which is used to choose the sample.

  2. Maths Statistical Coursework

    This time, the box and whisker plot shows that the lower quartile is 0.35, with upper quartile being 1.05, meaning that the interquartile range is 0.7. The maximum recorded syllables for a word in the Daily Star was 4. A very important piece of data retrieved from the graph was

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work