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Testing the Performance of an Ion Chromatography Column

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Testing the Performance of an Ion Chromatography Column

Kristin Quinn

March 10, 2005

Quinn 1

Kristin Quinn

Instrumental Analysis Lab

10 March 2005

Ion Chromatography

Introduction

        Ion column chromatography is used to separate both cations and anions. The separation of ions is performed by using an ion exchange resin (this lab uses an anion exchange resin which is a high molecular weight polymer).         The amount of time required for certain ions to move through the column depends on the affinities of the ions. The mobile phase’s anions, sodium bicarbonate in this lab, will force the ion that’s being tested out of the column.                          

Procedure

  1. Given the choice of six 1000 ppm sodium salts, choose three. The solutions to choose from are: sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, sodium bromide, sodium sulfate, sodium phosphate, and sodium nitrate.
...read more.

Middle

22.216

3.77

1,677,754

6

15.936

4.18

1.203,493

7

49.597

5.6

3,745,628

8

8.69

9

10.88

        Quinn 3

The page wasn’t fully copied, so I didn’t have the numbers to the last two peaks. Once again, the peak at 3.77 is the F-. Peaks 4, 7, and 8 correspond to the buffer. The peak at 5.60 is also more Cl- contaminant.

Chloride:

Peak Number

Area %

RT (min)

Area

1

6.802

3.08

409,572

2

1.782

3.78

107,276

3

16.648

4.21

1,002,379

4

0.701

4.54

42,198

5

74.067

5.58

4,459,512

        The peak with the greatest area, peak #5, is from the chloride ion.

Bromide:

Peak Number

Area %

RT (min)

Area

1

6.811

3.78

90,057

2

8.485

4.2

112,178

3

43.667

5.53

577,337

4

22.294

8.7

294,762

5

18.743

16.62

247,815

...read more.

Conclusion

Quinn 5

bromide as an example. When the concentration was 1 ppm, the ion eluted at 8.70 minutes. By using 5 ppm sodium bromide, the retention time was at 9.01 minutes. In the last solution, the bromide concentration was 10 ppm, and the retention time was 8.76 minutes. The retention times were all very similar, even though the concentrations were varied.

        To sum it all up, I think the column performance was pretty good. The only slight problem we had was that some of the printouts had quite a few extra peaks. I’m not exactly sure what caused these. Also, on both of the sodium fluoride runs, there were obvious chloride peaks from contamination. We made sure to use separate pipets for each solution, so I’m not sure where that came from.

...read more.

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