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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1700

The aim of this coursework is to compare two different newspapers in two different manners. The first option in which I will be comparing them is to see how many words are in a sentence, and then cover parts of each newspaper with this scheme.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

GCSE Mathematics Coursework

Specify and Plan

The aim of this coursework is to compare two different newspapers in two different manners. The first option in which I will be comparing them is to see how many words are in a sentence, and then cover parts of each newspaper with this scheme.  I will be aiming to cover 80 sentences from each paper, and see how they differ in matter of words per sentence.

Not only this, but I will be also seeing how many pictures are shown on one page, on average, amongst both the papers.

First I shall pick two newspapers, one shall be a broadsheet and one shall be a tabloid. Then, is hall pick a few articles from each newspaper. I would need to have picked the same articles as it would be unfair if I chose different articles. The papers must be bought on the same day, with the same date on each paper. I will then find the articles I require, and then do the tasks that I have been set.

If there are any unfair problems, they will have to be resolved at the beginning. I will have to have a fair piece of data, and make sure that all the information I use is on the same day, that it is all from the same articles on each paper and that it should be counted equally, and accurate as possible.

...read more.

Middle

Out of the three articles that I have investigated, I have seen that the most commonly number of words tended to be between 11 > 20.  This should then be common in most tabloid newspapers as they all have the same concept to their newspapers.

The next table that I produced was also from the same paper, but it was from the political end of the Daily Star. Here is what the results showed from this section:

    Amount

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

        1 <  5

0

   6  < 10

III

3

  11 < 15

IIII I

9

  16 < 20

IIIII IIIII

19

  21 < 25

IIII IIII

28

  26 < 30

IIII

32

  31 < 35

II

34

  36 < 40

I

35

image03.png

 The graph shows that there were more words per sentence in this article in comparison to the other articles. This is shown in the sentence lengths between 11 < 25.

This shows that tabloid newspapers use fewer words per sentence to illustrate their use of pictures which will be shown at a later stage.

The next newspaper I shall be using is called The Daily Telegraph. It is known as a broadsheet newspaper, and the results will contrast to those of the tabloid newspaper.

The information I gathered varied in the mount of articles, as the articles were generally bigger.

Here is my first set of results:

    Amount

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

    1 <  5

I

1

1

   6  < 10

I

1

2

  11 < 15

IIIII I

6

8

  16 < 20

IIIII

5

13

  21 < 25

IIIII I

6

19

  26 < 30

IIIII I

6

25

  31 < 35

IIII

4

29

  36 < 40

I

1

30

image04.png

The information is gathered from an article also concerning David Beckam, but it is from another newspaper, The Daily Telegraph.

...read more.

Conclusion

Page Number

     Amount

Cumulative Frequency

Pictures Per Page

1  <  2

III

3

3

2  <  3

IIIII

5

8

3  <  4

III

3

11

4  <  5

IIIII II

7

18

5  <  6

IIIII IIIII IIIII II

17

35

6  <  7

III

3

38

7  <  8

IIIII IIIII III

13

51

8  <  9

IIIII I

7

58

image08.png

As this graph shows, the amounts of pictures per page were in great contrast to that of the broadsheet newspaper. Pictures averaged around 6 – 10 a page, which is a lot considering the amount from a broadsheet.

Interpret and Discuss

The patterns that were produced from these graphs and tables were as I predicted. They were correct to the way I interpreted them, as I said that a broadsheet would contain more words per sentence, than a tabloid newspaper would. A tabloid newspaper would contain more pictures than a broadsheet newspaper.

The graphs that came out of the results were predictable. It showed that generally, there were more words per sentence and fewer pictures on a page.

My original aim was to find out which newspaper contained the most words per sentence, and the newspaper that contained the most pictures per page.

Now that I have found out which one does which, I am not surprised as it is the exact results I predicted at the beginning of this experiment.

The only way I was able to stop this coursework from being biass was to use similar articles in both papers. I chose articles that had the same name, heading, or generally where about the same topic. If I had chosen random topics, then my results would have been random, and they would not have followed the pattern that I had expected.  

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparing length of words in newspapers section.

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