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the fencing problem

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Fencing Problem

Introduction

In this piece of maths coursework I am going to find out which shapes give the biggest area with a perimeter of 100m so that a farmer can fence of his field. I am going to find the area of several different shapes like triangles, rectangles, polygons and circles to see which shape give the biggest area to fence off his field. I will prove which shape gives the biggest area by putting my data into a line graph and a table of results.

Rectangles

First I will be looking at different rectangles with the same perimeter to find out which rectangle will give me the maximum area.

                    450m                                                                              350m

image00.pngimage01.png

 50m                                   50m                                 150m                                    150m                                            

                   450m                                                                               350m

image11.png

Perimeter = 1000m                                                                        perimeter = 1000m

...read more.

Middle

                                                                                       H = 83316.67

                                                                                       H = 83316.67                                  

                                                                                       H = 288.64

                          333.3mimage09.png

Base x height                              image10.png

         2

333.3 x 288.64image12.png

          2

Area = 48101.85

Base (m)

Height (m)

Area (m²)

333.3

288.64

48101.85

Graph including equilateral triangle

Circle

I am now going to find out the area of a circle with a perimeter of 1000m to see if it gives the maximum area.

image14.pngimage13.png

                                                          1000mimage15.pngimage16.png

image17.png

                                  159.2m

image18.png

The formula for the diameter is

C

D =                                                                                    R = D

                                                                                                 2

1000

D = 318.5m                                                                       R = 318.5

                                                                                                     2

D = 318.5m    

                                                                                       Radius = 159.2m

image19.png

Pentagon

Now I am going to find the area of regular polygons. I will start off with a pentagon cause it has the least amount of sides in my tables and graphs

Pentagons have 5 sides and the perimeter is 1000m so each side must be 200 because 1000 ÷ 5 = 200

image20.pngimage21.pngimage23.png

image25.pngimage24.pngimage26.png

image27.png

image28.png

This is equivalent

...read more.

Conclusion

÷ 9 = 111.11

image81.png

              111.11        

image81.png

        20        

                                                                           H    

     55.555m

        152.63

                      111.11

Decagon

A decagon has 10 sides and has a perimeter of 1000m so I have to do 1000  ÷ 10 = 100m

image82.png

image82.png

                                                                                                                                 18

H

50m        50m

        153.88

                      100m

Number of sides

Base

Area

3

333.3

48101.85

4

250

62500

5

200

68800

6

166.66

72162.1134

7

142.857

74174.87

8

125

75440

9

111.11

76314.24

10

100

76940

Circle

Infinite

79582.2

Conclusion

After finding the area of the following shapes – rectangle, square, triangle, circle and the polygons, I found out that the shape with the maximum area is the circle. You can clearly see in the graph and table above that no other shape reaches the area of the circle, which makes it the shape with the maximum area. Looking back at the graph you can see that none of the other shapes even if you carry on will ever reach the area of the circle. So the shape that gives the biggest area, for the farmer to fence off his field is the circle.

By Joseph Marlow

...read more.

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