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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 2738

The Guardian vs. The Mirror - I am doing an investigation into the statistical differences between the daily tabloid newspapers, and the weekly broadsheet newspapers.

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Introduction

The Guardian vs. The Mirror I am doing an investigation into the statistical differences between the daily tabloid newspapers, and the weekly broadsheet newspapers. My overall hypothesis is that the daily tabloid papers - here represented by the Saturday edition of The Mirror, a daily tabloid - make an easier read than the more comprehensive broadsheet - here represented by the Guardian, a weekly broadsheet - To reach a conclusion, I plan to test three hypothesise in specific area. I will use a range of sampling methods, and presentation of data, in order to form valid conclusions. Planning 1 - My hypothesis is that the number of letters per word will be greater in the Guardian than in the Mirror. Number of letters - I will count the number of letters in every fourth word. In order to make my calculations accurate enough to reach a valid conclusion, I must collect a minimum of twenty pieces of data from each newspaper. I was planning to collect data from fourth word, in the first sentence on each page. However, if my second hypothesis is correct, then the sentences in the Guardian will be longer than those in The Mirror. This would corrupt the results, as some would be more accurate than others. So, I have decided to take the fourth and the eighth word from the first article on each page. The sections of each paper I have chosen are twenty-five pages long, so this will provide more than enough data to support any conclusion I reach, and should incorporate all sections of each newspaper. ...read more.

Middle

However, the mode for the Guardian is still low, but that is because there are still many more words with 5-6 letters than there are with 12. However if you look at the range: Range for the Mirror: 8-1= 7 Range for the Guardian: 12-1=11 You can see that the Guardian does have a much larger range, demonstrating that it does use the longer words I predicted it would, although it obviously still has to use average length words as well. I will also use a histogram to back up the results shown above in a clearer format. No. of Letters Frequency of the Mirror Frequency Density 1-2 IIIII III 8/1 = 1 3-4 IIIII IIIII IIIII IIIII 20/3 = 6.66 5-6 IIIII IIIII III 13/5 = 2.6 7-8 IIIII IIII 9/7 = 1.29 (2dp) No. of Letters Frequency of the Guardian Frequency Density 1-2 IIIII 5/1 = 5 3-4 IIIII IIIII III 13/3 = 4.33 5-6 IIIII IIIII IIIII I 16/5 = 3.2 7-8 IIII 4/7 = 0.57 9-10 IIIII IIII 9/9 = 1 11-12 III 3/11 = 0.27 The Mirror Histogram y 6.7 6 5 4 3 2 1 x 0 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 The Guardian Histogram y 5 4 3 2 1 x 0 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 9-10 10-11 I conclude that my hypothesis was correct. The number of letters per word in the Guardian is greater than the number of letters per word in The Mirror. I think I tested it effectively and fairly, although it may have been useful to check the consistency of each result using standard deviation, or by working out the inter-quartile range. ...read more.

Conclusion

30.2 =936 1:156 0.006 8 16 16 x 30.2 =483 8:483 0.017 11 29 29 x 30.2 =876 11:876 0.013 9 14 14 x 30.2 =423 1:47 0.021 The Mirror y 68 x 64 x 60 56 x x 52 x 48 44 40 x 36 x 32 x x 28 x x 24 x x 20 x x x x x 16 x x x x x 12 x 8 4 10 2 4 6 8 10 12 X 0 The Guardian Y 130 x 120 x 110 100 x 90 80 x 70 x 60 50 x 40 x x x 30 x x x x x x x 20 x x x x x x x x 10 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 10 There doesn't appear to be any direct colleration between the no. of words in the headline, and the number of words in the article. I conclude that my hypothesis was incorrect, and therefore, I do not have the data to compare the two results. My overall conclusion is that my original hypothesis was correct. The fact that the Guardian uses longer words, has longer sentences, and you can see from my third investigation, has longer articles, shows that it is aimed at the more intelligent reader, who intends to find out more about the subject in context. I think my investigation went well, although section three's results were disappointing. I think I investigated them in the quickest, fairest way possible, and displayed them clearly, in number of ways, represent the results. 1 ...read more.

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