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The Magic of Vedic Mathematics.

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Introduction

The Magic of Vedic Mathematics

All the students nowadays use a calculator for working out even some of the easiest calculations.

You may wonder what the people did when there was no calculator.

Well, in India there was Vedic Mathematics. It originated from the Vedas of Hindu.

I am going to illustrate some examples of how Vedic Mathematics works. You will be astonished at how fast you can do some of the calculations.

Let us start with some easy stuff.

Finding the square of adjacent numbers:

(a) Say you know the square of 60 = 3600, then the square of 61 will be given as (60)^2 + (60 + 61) = 3600 + 121 = 3721.

(b) If you want to find the square of 26,

(25)^2 + (25 + 26) = 625 + 51 = 676.

Apply it to find the square of a number which is 1 more than the number whose square is known.

Suppose you

...read more.

Middle

Suppose you want to find the square of 11111,

Check the number of 1s in the number, i.e. 5.

So write 12345 and then write in the reverse order, 4321.

So the answer is 123454321.

Square of a number having all digits 3.

If you want to find the square of 3333

Check the number of 3s in the figure, i.e. 4.

So write three 1s, one 0, three 8s and one 9.

Three because the number of 1s and 8s must be one less than the number of 3s in the original number.

The number of 0s and 9s will always be one.

So the answer will be 11108889.

Square of a number having all digits 6.

Suppose you want to find the square of 6,66,666.

See the number of 6s in the value, i.e. 6.

So write five 4s, one 3, five 5s and one 6.

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Conclusion

Therefore, 6 x 7 = 42. This will be the LHS of the answer.

So the answer will be 4224.

Finding the cube root of a number.

For finding the cube root of any number, first put a comma after 3 digits from right.

e.g. Finding the cube root of 9261.

Put a comma after three digits from right. i.e. 9,261.

Now check the last digit of the number, here 1. And put the number whose cube has the last digit as the last digit of the number whose cube root is to be found. This will be the RHS of the answer.

Now, check the number on the left of the comma.

Check which number has its cube less than the number left of the comma. Over here, it will be 2 as cube of 2 = 8 and 8 is less than 9 and the cube of 3 will be more than 9. This will be the LHS of the answer.

So the answer will be 21.

...read more.

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