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This investigation will be comparing the use of language by two types of newspaper. The broadsheet and the tabloid.

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Introduction

Mathematics Investigation By Ben Lewis Introduction This investigation will be comparing the use of language by two types of newspaper. The broadsheet and the tabloid. The broadsheet type newspaper is aimed at the more intellectual part of our society. The tabloid type newspaper is aimed at the less educated part of our society. If the above statement is true, then we would expect the broadsheet newspaper to use longer sentences with longer words, than the tabloid newspaper. This investigation will look at the number of letters in words and the number of words in sentences in a tabloid and broadsheet newspaper. Prediction I predict that the length of the words will be longer in the broadsheet newspaper. ...read more.

Middle

4. With the broadsheet newspaper, count the number of letters in words and make a tally chart of the results. Repeat this for the tabloid newspaper. Do the same for the number of words in sentences. 5. Calculate the cumulative frequency for all of the results. 6. Draw cumulative frequency graphs. All cumulative frequency graphs have a similar shape. This shape is an ogive. Ogive Cumulative frequency Sample 7. Estimate the median from the cumulative frequency graph. The median is found by halving the total cumulative frequency, read along from this point to the ogive, then read down. 8. Find the inter-quartile range. This range is useful to see how well the frequencies are dispersed. ...read more.

Conclusion

The inter-quartile range shows the dispersion of the frequencies to be similar. As shown by the comparison graphs (not as predicted). Evaluating the length of sentences The results show that the length of the sentences are not that similar (as predicted). The longest sentence in the broadsheet is 33 words and 27 in the tabloid newspaper (as predicted). The median shows that the average sentence length is 22 words in the broadsheet newspaper and 20 in the tabloid newspaper (as predicted). The inter-quartile range shows the dispersion of frequencies to be greater in the broadsheet newspaper than the tabloid newspaper (as predicted). Conclusion My prediction was partly correct. The broadsheet newspaper didn't use longer words but it did use longer sentences. The use of English is similar in both newspapers. The tabloid newspaper is getting its information to the reader in shorter sentences. ...read more.

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