• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Transformation Patterns. Our aim was to take different 3 digit number patterns and make a pattern that was instructed in the worksheet, and then find a correlation between the pattern of numbers and the line of symmetry and the order of rotation.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

TRANSFORMATION INVESTIGATION BY Naman Shah & Aman More Aim: Our aim was to take different 3 digit number patterns and make a pattern that was instructed in the worksheet, and then find a correlation between the pattern of numbers and the line of symmetry and the order of rotation. For example if the number chosen was X,Y,Z then we were first supposed to take a starting point, and facing up the page go x square forward and turn 90 degrees clockwise. ...read more.

Middle

Our formula basically gave the instructions: repeat (move x units forward, then turn 90 degrees, now move y units forward, then again turn 90 degrees, finally move z units forward and turn 90 degrees) 4 times. This caused the pattern to be repeated until the time it got back to the starting point (the small square). Using observation, we found the number of lines of symmetry (if any) for each shape, along with the order of rotation. ...read more.

Conclusion

001 4 4 132 0 4 120 4 4 135 0 4 413 0 4 333 4 4 232 4 4 322 4 4 101 4 4 721 4 4 234 0 4 Conclusion: We conclude by stating that we have found that if the numbers are X, Y and Z: Pattern No. of Lines of Symmetry Order of Rotation X (X+1) (X+2) 0 4 X Y Z 0 4 X X Y 4 4 X (X+2) (X+4) 0 4 ?? ?? ?? ?? Naman Shah & Aman More TRANSFORMATION INVESTIGATION ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Miscellaneous section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

An interesting piece of work. Most of the examples of reflective and rotational symmetry are accurate but there could have been more exhaustive patterns in the summary. 3 stars

Marked by teacher Mick Macve 18/03/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Miscellaneous essays

  1. GCSE Maths Shape Coursework

    I am predicting that there will be straightforward correlation between P, D and T. I also expect that as the value of P increases, the value of D will decrease. I say this because a circle is the shape with the largest area for its perimeter, and all the area is bunched together.

  2. Equable shapes

    As you can see the Lines do not touch but if I had carried my investigation into higher numbers there would be an equable shape. I will produce a formula to find out the equable shape. The formula is: P=2L+6 A=3L 3L=2L+6 3L-2L=6 L=6 This shows that the length must

  1. Guttering Investigation

    is part of my hypothesis, will be used it as a comparison against the other cross sectional areas I will work out. Triangular Cross Section This is to be the next cross sectional area I work out. It shall be an isosceles triangle (so both sides can hold the same level of water).

  2. T-Total Maths coursework

    numbers in the T are arranged and I can see that it is From this I can see that on a 9 by 10 grid the formula equals N + (N-9) + (N-18) + (N+17) + (N-19) I can now simplify this by gathering up all the n terms and

  1. Tubes. I was given a piece of card measuring 24 cm by 32cm, and ...

    1150.72 5.9 6.1 35.99 1151.68 6 6 36 1152 Formula for a square y/4 * y/4 = area (y/4 * y/4) * x = volume Simplified version = y2/16 * x --> xy2/16 Triangles Base of triangle Dimensions of triangle Area in cm2 Volume in cm3 10 7 24.49 783.68

  2. Layers investigation

    The next grid size that I used was a 3 by 3 grid. In a 3 by 3 grid, there are nine squares. This means there are 9 possible empty squares and 8 possible filled in squares. This is proof that the number of filled in squares is one less than the number of possible empty squares.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work