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Trimino Maths Coursework

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Introduction

Trimino Maths Coursework For this maths investigation, we had to investigate and patterns that we discovered involving the numbers used on a Truman and thereby deduce formulae to help us calculate unknowns. A trimino is similar to a domino yet has three side, as below. To begin with, I investigated the relationship between the highest number appearing on the trimino and the number of possible combinations. The table below shows the highest number o the trimino and the number of possible triminos. ...read more.

Middle

I applied to the results I achieved. My working is shown below: I substituted numbers into my formula to ensure it worked. My results matched those I had expected and therefore the formula I believe holds for all cases. After this, I moved on to try and link the number of combinations possible on a trimino to the previous one, thereby deriving an iterative formula. I again drew up a table of the highest number and the number of possible combinations on the triminios. ...read more.

Conclusion

After this, I moved on to investigate the relationship between the highest umber appearing on the trimino and the sum of all the numbers on all the triminos. The table below shows the highest number on the trimino and the sum of all the combinations and the difference between each one As you can see there is four difference till a constant is achieved. Therefore I changed my previous formula and applied it to my numbers. The new formula is: I then applied it to my numbers. I substituted in numbers to ensure my formula was correct. The numbers worked and I believe that this formula is correct ...read more.

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