• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19
  20. 20
    20
  21. 21
    21
  22. 22
    22
  23. 23
    23
  24. 24
    24
  25. 25
    25
  26. 26
    26
  27. 27
    27
  28. 28
    28
  29. 29
    29
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 4267

Urban Settlements have much greater accessibility than rural settlements. Is this so?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Urban Settlements have much greater accessibility than rural settlements. Is this so? This issue has come up because as commuters move out of the cities and into rural settlements, accessibility can become a factor as they go to and from work. This problem is experienced all over the country, especially around London and other conurbations. This problem is called counter-urbanisation. It happens with industry, housing, and other infrastructure. My study area is centred in the SE of England, in SE London. It is between Bexley, and South Darenth, two villages roughly the same size and place. Refer to the maps on the other page for exact locations, and local road networks. Although they are both roughly the same size, Bexley has many more shops than S Darenth, which may cause the accessibility to be slightly better or be the result of better access in the first place, because of the need for good parking, etc... I will investigate this as part of the report. S Darenth is 4 miles from Bexley, and Bexley is approx 14 miles from Charing Cross, the centre of London. Bexley is a much older village, which explains why it is slightly more developed than S Darenth. They have roughly the same industry history, both of them having a major industry in its day. Today, Bexley is a much more industrial town. It has an industrial estate in the centre of the town, with over 20 different industries operating alone. As the subject of my study is accessibility, I will perform traffic counts and pedestrian counts in the area. This data will make up the core of my project, because it will show how easy it is to move between towns. I will analyse bus and train timetables, and the percentage of footway to road. Also, I will analyse the road widths. The counts will be in the form of tally charts and diagrams, and the timetables will be analysed for frequency, and routes served. ...read more.

Middle

My pedestrian counts were in the same place as my traffic counts. Select a suitable period to do your counts, and a suitable time of day. I did mine on a mid-afternoon on a Sunday. Each count lasted 5 minutes. Once your variables have been chosen, go to that spot, and record on your tally chart the number of people that pass your point in your time. I.e. record how many OAP's, Teenagers etc... In order for an overall picture to be assumed, counts should be done in both directions. My count results are shown on the next pages. I used exactly the strategy I have set out above, for both villages. Bexley: First count performed in Salisbury Rd at 14:15 on Sunday. Away from Bexley Village... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: | || Total: 1 Total: 0 Total: 2 Total: 0 Total: 0 Second count performed in Salisbury Rd at 14:15 on Sunday. Towards Bexley Village... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Third count performed in Bexley High Street at 14:35. Away from Sidcup... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: ||| ||||| | Total: 0 Total: 3 Total: 5 Total: 1 Total: 0 Fourth count performed in Bexley High Street at 14:35. Towards Sidcup... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: | | Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 1 Total: 1 Total: 0 Fifth Count performed in Bourne Road at 14:50. Away from Bexley... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Sixth Count performed in Bourne Road at 14:50. Towards Bexley... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Total: 0 Overall Bexley has a low-ish pedestrian density overall. South Darenth: First count performed in Holmesdale Rd at 14:15 on Sunday. Away from Dartford... Under 18: 19-30: 31-45: 46-60: 61+: | | Total: 1 Total: 0 Total: 1 Total: 0 Total: 0 Second count performed in Holmesdale Rd at 14:15 on Sunday. ...read more.

Conclusion

they were routed through the centre of the town. Passenger loads were increased, but they held up traffic. South Darenth does not have this problem, as there is only one bus! Also, Bexley has a train station, but S Darenth does not. The nearest station to Darenth was Farningham Road, which had a greatly reduced timetable than Bexley because again, it does not serve a wide enough area to necessitate a continual service. The road widths were used to backup findings about the village's infrastructure. South Darenth has a good structure, with adequate width, but if the town were to expand, the roads would become overloaded with traffic and buses. In Bexley the roads were too narrow. Even if More yellow lines were introduced, it would not affect the situation a great deal. I think the bypass (now scrapped) would have been a good idea. (See map) Something that I did not study in this project is shops. In both towns, the accessibility largely depended on how many shops there were, i.e. the reasons for the accessibility. From what I observed while doing my counts was that Bexley village had many more shops than S Darenth, and this was the probable reason why more buses served Bexley than Darenth. If I had to say which village was more accessible, I would say t hat it was South Darenth, because its infrastructure can cope with the demand. If the village were to expand, it would need a traffic contingency plan to avoid hold ups and bottlenecks. Bexley's problem is with traffic flow. If Thanet Road was expanded and buses were diverted via here, traffic would be eased. Glossary: * Accessibility - How easy it is for the public to travel around a town * Commuters - People working away from towns who rely on accessibility to go to work * Conurbation - A small village * Counter-Urbanisation - The movement of people from towns to the countryside * * * * J Horgan Centre No: 14103 Candidate No: 6055 Page No: 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE T-Total section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE T-Total essays

  1. ICT Coursework: Data Management Systems

    To make sure that the spreadsheet can be used to full potential, some objectives have been set, outlining what my mum needs the spreadsheet to be able to do: * It must be able to produce a total for cards sold; * It must be able to produce a total

  2. For this task we were required to create a model that can be used ...

    Similar to the split rate model, a split value is needed which determines the value at which the pricing will change. Also, similar to the split rate model, the price after the split value is usually less than before it.

  1. Modelling Motorway Toll Charging

    B: PROCEDURE Search Wanted:Reg_Array; Wanted:=Temp.Reg; Owner_Record(0).Reg:= Wanted; -- record in sentinal value is set to wanted Position:=counter; WHILE Owner_record(Position).reg /= Wanted DO Position:=Position-1; END IF Position =0 THEN Counter:=Counter+1; Create_New; ELSE Update; END IF; C: PROCEDURE Create_New Owner_Record(counter):=Temp; D: PROCEDURE Update IF

  2. To prove that out of town shopping is becoming increasingly popular with shoppers, and ...

    They originated from the 19th Century, well before the time of cars and public transport. They sold convenience goods- milk, bread, newspapers, sweets- things that people want, but don't want to walk far for. This was a friendly atmosphere where people, mostly elderly, could use to meet.

  1. Pay Role Model.

    The wage bill will increase dramatically. Without formula With Formula My predictions were correct because the overtime hours increase because the total wage bill increased a lot. So I was correct.

  2. I am going to investigate how changing the number of tiles at the centre ...

    To test this hypothesis I will draw a larger diagram and count the total amount of tiles to check my formula. If I was to let the pattern number be N= 7, (See below) then: T= 2N� + 4N + 2 = 2(7)� + 4(7)

  1. ICT system analysis and modelling.

    VAT 493.50 The mileage cost was a simple equation =(F14*I9)which is the mileage total times by the price per mile. It was a simple formulas used to find out the mileage cost.

  2. I have decided to carry out a simulation on a real life situation. A ...

    Inter-arrival times Random numbers 0 to 3 00-39 4 to 7 40-71 8 to11 72-83 12 to 15 84-85 16 to 19 86-87 20 to 23 88-95 24 to 27 96-97 28 to 31 98-99 Also from this data I can now work out percentage frequency for the Service duration times.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work