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Was a visit to Styal Mill the best way to learn about the working and living conditions in nineteenth century Textile mills in England?

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Introduction

Was a visit to Styal Mill the best way to learn about the working and living conditions in nineteenth century Textile mills in England? In this essay I am going to answer if I think a visit to Styal mill was the best way to learn about working and living conditions and mill life in general in the 19th century. I will examine working conditions and living conditions at Styal and compare them to other Manchester mills. I will also compare age, hours, wages, Apprentice system, life and death, health, discipline, accidents and society. Children started working at the mill from the age of 9 and worked up to the age of 18 when they carried on working or found lodgings. ...read more.

Middle

8/- 6/6d to 7/- 1838-50 Mule Spinners (male) 16/- to 22/- 10/- to 13/- 1838-50 Throstle Spinners (female) 7/6d to 10/6d 6/- to 7/- 1846-50 Weavers (male and female) 10/6d to 11/- 6/6d to 8/- Education was provided as a treat an hour or two on Sunday and Samuel Greg built an Apprentice house by 1790 Greg was unable to recruit his entire workforce locally so children were brought in from London, Liverpool, Cardiff, Norwich and Birmingham. The Apprentices at Styal Mill were looked after by a superintendent and his wife and they provided food lodgings, doctor and some education. The apprentice system at Styal Mill was abandoned in 1947. The standard of family living at Styal was considered better than those in Manchester. ...read more.

Conclusion

Fines were paid by the children working overtime. A serious offence was to run away from the mills, as this caused great inconvenience. Mills were full of people working long hours with unfamiliar machines, this had great risks of injury and fire. Accidents were very common in cotton mills. In 1833 machines were fenced off, and this was not made compulsory until 1944, so although the Gregs Safety Record compared favourably with others. Overall I do think the trip to Styal Mills is the best way to learn about mill life in the 19th Century, because it was one of the greatest mills there was in England. It particularly focused on working and living conditions and improved them for its workers and I think it is certainly the best and most interesting way to learn about how the working and living conditions were improved at Quarry Bank Mill, due to Samuel Greg. ...read more.

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