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What does the language of this extract reveal about Dr. Grantly and the way he treats his fellow men?

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Introduction

Peter Kennedy

What does the language of this extract reveal about Dr. Grantly and the way he treats his fellow men?

I think that the way Dr. Grantly treats his fellow men is shown in the very first line, when he begins his speech with the words “Now my men.” The keyword here is ‘my’ because it shows that he regards himself, perhaps even unconsciously, as superior to the bedesmen. I think that this attitude towards the bedesmen is also shown with his next words “I want to say a few words to you.” I think that the revealing words here are the first two, ‘I want’, because it is as if he thinks that they are not worth him asking if they want to listen to him. It would have been less

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Middle

“My men.” He then domes to the main part of his speech where he lays out his views. He uses rhetorical questions a lot here and in them says things like “Worn-out old men, worn-out labouring men, infirm old men past their work, cripples, blind, bedridden, and such like”, which are veiled insults if not blatantly obvious insults. I think that the fact that Dr. Grantly has stated what he thinks so bluntly shows that he thinks the men need things ‘spelled out’ for them, probably because he thinks that they are not at all clever. I think it also shows that the Archdeacon can say what he likes to the men without any fear of reprisals. I think that he feels he can say what he likes to the men without
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Conclusion

“Never get a hundred pence a year more than what you have now.” I think that this bold statement shows that he assumes that he will have won over all the men to his point of view by now because he is offering them a way out from their actions if they accept that they were misguided by “Wicked men who are acting for their own ends.”

I think that the final part of the passage that shows something about Dr. Grantly’s character is in the last paragraph. He is clearly not used to being interrupted before he finishes a speech, as he even regards Harding’s brief input as an “Ebullition”, which means a sudden, violent outburst. This last paragraph also shows that Dr. Grantly regards his own dignity as very important to uphold because he felt that “He could not recommence with dignity after this little ebullition.”

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