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Which sources of knowledge-books, websites, media, personal experience, authorities or some other-do you consider most trustworthy, and why?

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Introduction

Skagerak International School 2002/2003 IB1 Theory Of Knowledge         09.05.2003

Teacher: Ms. Davis

Student: Robin Dominik Havre

Which sources of knowledge-books, websites, media, personal experience, authorities or some other–do you consider most trustworthy, and why?

The most formal and probably also most correct (in TOK sense) way to define knowledge is something like “Something to regard as true beyond doubt”[1], or in other words something which is true. Personally, I believe that since the definition of knowledge says that what you know has to be true, it is incorrect to say that you know something. Who am I to claim what’s true and what’s not, when even the greatest of scientist and thinkers have claimed to know something which some hundred years later has been proved false?

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Middle

[2] that the brain works, arranging what we experience in groups of what we consider similar experiences.
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Conclusion


[1]The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition

[2] Ironic use of the word “know”, huh? This explanation of how the brain sorts its inputs is one of the many things I consider as “true”, and I use this “knowledge” of mine to explain why you should not always trust your mind. But to be perfectly honest with you I have no clue of how the brain works, but it makes sense, and this essay would be impossible to write if I did not “trust” anything. Or in other words, I just found another reason why not to trust my mind, it considers something to be true because it makes it easier (or possible) to explain something else. Shortly; This essay is heavily biased because I have to trust something to be able to explain anything, when really, I would prefer not to ;)

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