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Advertising is a key part of the sales process.

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Introduction

Advertising is a key part of the sales process. More than �12 billion is spent on advertising every year in the UK, quite a phenomenal amount. So why do people spend out so much on advertising their products? It seems like a terrific waste of money, until you look more closely into the whole process. A fundamental reason behind advertising is the susceptibility of children to adverts. Adults, having developed a slightly more cynical view of the world, are more likely to see through adverts. Younger children, on the other hand, are easily influenced and more na�ve. They see an advert for a toy of their favourite superhero, say Spiderman. The advert shows the action figure shooting webs from his wrists and swinging along tables. In actual fact the figure will do none of these things, but the child doesn't realise this, and goes to beg his or her parents for the toy. Often the parents give in to satisfy the child and stop him or her from whining. In this case the adverts are targeting a younger audience, and are very effective. Adverts aimed at a more mature audience use different techniques. They might use statistics and factual information to sound more believable. ...read more.

Middle

At the top of the advert is a message in bold white print that stands out. It says, "Max Factor's Lipfinity. It doesn't just last. It lasts beautifully." The message is short and to the point. But the main thing to note is the word "beautifully." Words and ideas with positive connotations are used to suggest that the positive qualities should be associated with the product and the user. There is a good use of layout, with the three main pictures and main message at the top and in the centre, bigger than the rest of the advert to stand out and get attention, then the other details in smaller print below. Finally, in small print, the advert gives a quote from a make-up artist saying that no other lipstick can promise more. A quote from someone who ought to know what they are talking about - a scientist if the subject is scientific, a make-up artist if it concerns make-up - makes people more likely to believe in the product and the advert. The second advert is for OXY shower wash to prevent spots. This advert is probably targeting teenagers who are most prone to spots and are most likely to feel insecure about them. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is also a website at the bottom of the page encouraging people to explore the products further. The final advert is for Maybelline Fruity Jelly lip-glosses. For a start there's the catchy Maybelline slogan, which makes use of alliteration and repetition: "Maybe she's born with it. Maybe it's Maybelline." This makes us think yes, we too can look like the beautiful model advertising the product. Then there's the fact that a famous personality is used to endorse the product - Josie Maran. If a famous person who can afford any make-up approves of the product, people think it must be good. There is a picture of a succulent looking strawberry behind the lip-glosses, which gives us a positive connotation, as it looks juicy and delicious - just as the lip-glosses are meant to be. Now we associate the lip-glosses with something that we know to be fruity. The bright, appealing colours of the lip-glosses contrast nicely with the plain white background, making them look more exotic. The woman wearing the lip-gloss is smiling which gives us a subliminal message that wearing the lip-gloss will make us happy as it has her. The message reads, "For delicious glossy lips with a hint of colour, pick a sweet fruity flavour." Again many words with positive connotations are being used to make us feel positive about the product - delicious, glossy, sweet and fruity. ...read more.

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